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Comparitive Religion Banner

Introduction | Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies
Minor in Religious Studies | Minor in Christian Studies
Minor in Jewish Studies | Comparitive Religion Courses
Dept Homepage


DEPARTMENT CHAIR
James Santucci

DEPARTMENT OFFICE
University Hall 313

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE
http://hss.fullerton.edu/comparative

PROGRAMS OFFERED
Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies
Minor in Religious Studies
Minor in Christian Studies
Minor in Jewish Studies

FACULTY
Benjamin Hubbard, M. Zakyi Ibrahim, Paul Levesque, James Santucci, Jeanette Reedy Solano, Bradley Starr

ADVISERS
All programs: James Santucci and Paul Levesque

Religion field trip

INTRODUCTION
Comparative Religion examines the spiritual quest of humankind, especially as it has manifested itself in the world’s living religions. These include Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and other less familiar traditions. No other academic field looks at the origins, sacred writings, rituals, beliefs and world views of the various religions for their own sake rather than as an aspect of another field of study.

Within a public university, religion must be approached with academic objectivity and without favoritism for any one tradition. Yet, religion must also be studied with sensitivity and empathy for the millions of believers whose lives are shaped by their faith. Comparative Religion is also an interdisciplinary field which draws on the work of social scientists, historians, philosophers, and literary scholars in attempting to understand the religious quest. Hence, studying religious traditions develops habits of mind that are very important for life in our multicultural society. Furthermore, a familiarity with the world’s religions is necessary for an understanding of church-state issues in America and of geo-political conflicts in South Asia, the Middle East, and elsewhere.

The Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies is designed for those who (1) want a humanities undergraduate background focusing on religion as a preparation for further study in such fields as education, law, social work, counseling and government service; (2) wish to pursue graduate studies in religion with the aim of teaching and/or doing research in the subject; (3) are considering a career in various religious ministries or in religious education.

Because the major consists of 36 units of course work (less than some other fields), it may be possible to add a second major in, for example, Communications, History, Human Services or Philosophy. Such double majors may strengthen a student’s job preparation or background for graduate studies.

Minors in religion are offered in three areas depending on a student’s particular interest: Religious Studies (comparative emphasis), Christian Studies (an emphasis on Christianity in its many forms), and Jewish Studies (an emphasis on the Judaic tradition).

Mission and Goals
Mission
To describe and interpret the developments, worldviews and practices of religious traditions in a non-sectarian, academic manner for the benefit of students, faculty from other fields and the greater Orange County community.

Goals

  1. To offer classes in the worlds’ religions within the general Education framework and for majors ad minors;
  2. To teach in a scholarly and non-sectarian manner;
  3. To conduct scholarly research that contributes to an understanding of the varieties of religious thought and experience;
  4. To investigate in a scholarly manner the impact of the varieties of religious thought and experience on cotemporary society.
Awards in Comparative Religion
Two graduating seniors are recognized each year with the James O’Shea/Joseph Kalir Award for Outstanding Scholarship by a graduating senior and the James Parkes/Morton Fierman Award for Student Achievement (for service to the department and university and/or for interfaith work within and outside the university). The Donald Gard Award is given annually to a non-graduating Religious Studies major for academic achievement. In addition, the Althea and Robert McLaren Award recognizes the student (majoring or minoring in religious studies) judged to have written the outstanding essay in a Comparative Religion class in a particular year.

International Learning Opportunities in Comparative Religion
The Religious Studies major within the Department of Comparative Religion requires the study of the world’s religions, thereby necessitating an examination of religion in other cultural and national settings. This is particularly true of courses dealing with Asian religions such as Hinduism and Buddhism, and a predominantly Middle Eastern faith—Islam. Moreover, the Department encourages students to study abroad. See the department chair or undergraduate adviser if interested.

Graduate Study
The department works cooperatively with the Department of Religion in the Claremont Graduate School. Please contact the chair or undergraduate adviser about specific cooperative arrangements.

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES
The Bachelor of Arts in Religious Studies (36 units) requires a minimum of 120 units which includes courses for the major, General Education, all-University requirements, and free electives. The 27 units of core courses are required of all majors. In addition, students must take 9 units from either the Experience/Research Plan or the Streamlined Teacher Education Program (STEP) Plan. Students following the STEP Plan must meet all requirements of STEP, including an additional 15 units of designated courses, bringing the total to 135 units, leading to a B.A. in Religious Studies and completion of the Multiple Subject Credential Program. Each course counted toward the major must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher.

Core Courses (27 units)
Lower-Division Requirements (9 units)
Introduction to the Study of Religion (3 units)
Comparative Religion 105 Religion and the Quest for Meaning (3)
Comparative Religion 110 Religions of the World (3)

Introduction to Western Religious Traditions (3 units)
Comparative Religion 200 Introduction to Christianity (3)
Comparative Religion 201 Introduction to the New Testament (3)
Comparative Religion 210 Introduction to Judaism (3)
Comparative Religion 250 Introduction to Islam (3)

Introduction to Non-Western Religious Traditions (3 units)
Comparative Religion 270T Introduction to the Asian Religions (3)
Comparative Religion 280 Introduction to Buddhism (3)

Upper-Division Requirements (18 units)
Methods and Concepts (6 units)
Comparative Religion 300 Methods of Studying Religion (3)
Comparative Religion 485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3)*

The Development of Western Religious Thought (6 units)
Comparative Religion 345A History and Development of Early Christian Thought (3)
Comparative Religion 345B History and Development of Modern Christian Thought (3)
Comparative Religion 346A
         History and Development of Jewish Thought: Biblical and Rabbinical Eras (3)
Comparative Religion 346B History and Development of Jewish Thought: Medieval and Modern Eras (3)
Comparative Religion 349A History and Development of Islamic Thought: The Beginning to 1258 (3)
Comparative Religion 349B History and Development of Islamic Thought: 1259 to Modern Times (3)
Comparative Religion 350T Major Christian Traditions (3)
History/Comparative Religion 405 History of the Jews (3)
History/Comparative Religion 406 The Holocaust (3)
History/Comparative Religion 417B Roman Empire (3)
History 420 The Byzantine Empire (3)
History/Comparative Religion 421A History of the Christian Church to the Reformation (1517) (3)
History/Comparative Religion 421B
         History of the Christian Church from the Reformation to the Present (3)
History/Comparative Religion 425B The Reformation (3)
History/Comparative Religion 466A Islamic Civilization: Arab Era (3)
_______________________
*May be taken only after completion of 15 units in Comparative Religion, including Comparative Religion 105 or 110 and 300, and junior standing.
History/Comparative Religion 466B Islamic Civilization: Imperial Age (3)
History/Comparative Religion 483 American Religious History (3)

The Development of Non-Western Religious Thought (6 units)
Afro-Ethnic/Comparative Religion 325 African American Religions and Spirituality (3)
Comparative Religion 337 American Indian Religions
and Philosophy (3)
Comparative Religion 347A Hindu Tradition to 400 B.C.E. (3)
Comparative Religion 347B Hindu Tradition from 400 B.C.E. (3)
Philosophy 350 Asian Philosophy (3)
Comparative Religion 354T Topics in Buddhism (3)
Comparative Religion 370 New Religious Movements in the U.S.A. (3)
History/Comparative Religion 465A History of India (3)
History/Comparative Religion 465B History of India (3)

Plan Options (9)
Choose either Experience/Research Plan OR STEP Plan

Experience/Research Plan (9)
Comparative Religion 305 Contemporary Practices of the World’s Religions (3)
Comp Lit/Comparative Religion 312 The Bible as Literature (3)
Comparative Religion 335 Judaism, Christianity, and
Islam Compared (3)
Philosophy/Comparative Religion 348 Philosophy of Religion (3)
Comparative Religion 358 Comparative Mysticism (3)
Comparative Religion 367 Latino/a Spirituality and Religion (3)
Comparative Religion 380 Religion and Violence (3)
Comparative Religion 381 Religion and Politics in the
United States (3)
Comparative Religion 397 Religion and Science (3)
Comparative Religion 400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary Culture (3)
Sociology/Comparative Religion 458 Sociology of
Religious Behavior (3)
Textual Studies (3)
Comparative Religion 330T Hebrew Scriptural Studies (3)
Comparative Religion 331T New Testament Studies (3)
Comparative Religion 401T Studies in Religious Texts (3)

Streamlined Teacher Education Plan (STEP) (9)
Diversity and Education (3)
Elem Ed 325 Cultural Pluralism in Elementary Schools (3)
World History and Literature (6)
History 100A World Civilizations to the 16th Century (3)
English/CompLit 110 Literature of the Western World from Ancient
through Medieval times (3)

Writing Requirement
The course requirement of the university upper-division baccalaureate writing course is met through Comparative Religion 485T. It is highly recommended that students majoring in Religious Studies pursue the study of classical languages such as Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and Sanskrit when such languages are offered.

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MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Students minoring in Religious Studies are required to take 21 units in Comparative Religion, distributed as follows:

Lower-Division Requirements (9 units)
Introduction to the Study of Religion (3 units)
Comparative Religion 105 Religion and the Quest for Meaning (3)
Comparative Religion 110 Religions of the World (3)

Introduction to Western Religious Traditions (3 units)
Comparative Religion 200 Introduction to Christianity (3)
Comparative Religion 201 Origins of the New Testament (3)
Comparative Religion 210 Introduction to Judaism (3)
Comparative Religion 250 The Religion of Islam (3)

Introduction to Non-western Religious Traditions (3 units)
Comparative Religion 270T Introduction to the Asian Religions (3)
Comparative Religion 280 Introduction to Buddhism (3)

Upper Division (12 units)
Core Requirements (3 units)
Comparative Religion 300 Methods of Studying Religion (3)

Elective Courses (9 units)
Any nine units of upper-division courses in Comparative Religion. It is highly recommended that students minoring in Religious Studies pursue the study of classical languages such as Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and Sanskrit when such courses are offered.

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MINOR IN CHRISTIAN STUDIES

Students minoring in Religious Studies are required to take 21 units in Comparative Religion, distributed as follows:

Required Courses (12 units)

Comparative Religion 200 Introduction to Christianity (3)
Comparative Religion 300 Methods of Studying Religion (3)
Comparative Religion 345A History and Development of Early Christian Thought (3)
Comparative Religion 345B History and Development of Modern Christian Thought (3)

Elective Courses (9 units)
Comparative Religion 201 Introduction to the New Testament (3)
Comp Lit/Comparative Religion 312 The Bible as Literature (3)
Afro Ethnic/Comparative Religion 325 African-American Religions and Spirituality (3)
Comparative Religion 331T New Testament Studies (3)
Comparative Religion 335 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Compared (3)
Comparative Religion 350T Major Christian Traditions (3)
Comparative Religion 358 Comparative Mysticism (3)
Comparative Religion 367 Latino/a Spirituality and Religion (3)
Comparative Religion 380 Religion and Violence (3)
Comparative Religion 381 Religion and Politics in the United States (3)
Comparative Religion 400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary Culture (3)
Comparative Religion 401T Studies in Religious Texts* (3)
History/Comparative Religion 417B Roman Empire (3)
History 420 The Byzantine Empire (3)
History/Comparative Religion 421A History of the Christian Church to the Reformation (1517) (3)
History/Comparative Religion 421B
        History of the Christian Church from the Reformation to the Present (3)
History/Comparative Religion 425B The Reformation (3)
Sociology/Comparative Religion 458 Sociology of Religious Behavior (3)
History/Comparative Religion 483 American Religious History (3)
Comparative Religion 485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3)*
Comparative Religion 499 Independent Study (3)*

It is highly recommended that students minoring in Christian Studies pursue the study of classical languages such as Greek, Hebrew, and Latin when such courses are offered.
*When content pertains to the Christian tradition.

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MINOR IN JEWISH STUDIES
Students minoring in Jewish Studies are required to take 21 units, distributed as follows:

Required Courses (12 units)

Comparative Religion 210 Introduction to Judaism (3)
Comparative Religion 300 Methods of Studying Religion (3)
Comparative Religion 346A History and Development of Jewish Thought:
       Biblical and Rabbinical Eras (3)
Comparative Religion 346B History and Development of Jewish Thought:
       Medieval and Modern Eras (3)

Elective Courses (9 units)
Comp Lit/Comparative Religion 312 The Bible as Literature (3)
Comparative Religion 330T Hebrew Scriptural Studies (3)
Comparative Religion 335 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam Compared (3)
Comparative Religion 358 Comparative Mysticism (3)
Comparative Religion 380 Religion and Violence (3)
Comparative Religion 381 Religion and Politics in the United States (3)
Comparative Religion 400 Religion, the Media, and Contemporary Culture (3)
Comparative Religion 401T Studies in Religious Texts* (3)
History/Comparative Religion 405 History of the Jews (3)
History/Comparative Religion 406 The Holocaust (3)
Sociology/Comparative Religion 458 Sociology of Religious Behavior (3)
History 467 The Middle East in the 19th Century (3)
History 468 The Middle East in the 20th Century (3)
Comparative Religion 485T Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts (3)*
Comparative Religion 499 Independent Study (1-3)*

*When content pertains to the Jewish tradition.

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COMPARATIVE RELIGION COURSES
Courses are designated as CPRL in the class schedule.

CPRL 105    Religion and the Quest for Meaning

Description: Inquiry into the nature of religious experience as the human pursuit of meaning and transcendence, exploring its central themes, phenomena, and questions; its principal types of figures and communities; and its major categories of sacred rituals, objects, seasons, and places.
Units: (3)

CPRL 110    Religions of the World

Description: An introduction to at least five religious world views from an historical and comparative perspective, with descriptive analysis of their belief system, moral code, and symbolic rituals: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. One or more sections offered online. (Same as Philosophy 110)
Units: (3)

CPRL 200    Introduction to Christianity

Description: An overview of the Christian tradition including Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Protestant expressions. Foundational councils, creeds, scriptures, ideas, and worship styles are profiled.
Units: (3)

CPRL 201    Introduction to the New Testament

Description: Textual and historical study of the origins and content of the New Testament in the context of first-century Christianity.
Units: (3)

CPRL 210    Introduction to Judaism

Description: The Jewish tradition – its scriptures, laws, customs, holidays and world view in their historical setting.
Units: (3)

CPRL 246A    Basic Hatha Yoga

Description: (Same as Kinesiology 246A)
Units: (2)

CPRL 246B    Intermediate Hatha Yoga

Description: (Same as Kinesiology 246B.)
Units: (2)

CPRL 250    Introduction to Islam

Description: The religion of Islam, its background and main teachings: the rise of Islam; the caliphate; Islamic theology, teachings, mysticism and philosophy.
Units: (3)

CPRL 270T    Introduction to the Asian Religions

Description: The main teachings of a major South Asian, Far Eastern, or “Oriental” religion per semester. Such religions as Jainism, Hinduism, Taoism, Shintoism, and Zoroastrianism will be discussed. May be repeated for credit with different subject matter.
Units: (3)

CPRL 280    Introduction to Buddhism

Description: Introduction to the origins and development of Buddhism. Included in the course will be a discussion of the major teachings found in all traditions of Buddhism, the three major traditions of Buddhism, and the position of Buddhism in the U.S.
Units: (3)

CPRL 300    Methods of Studying Religion

Description: Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 110. The academic study of religion to include the definition, functions and varieties of religion; the methods used to study it; and key figures who have shaped the development of this discipline.
Units: (3)

CPRL 301    Sanskrit

Description: (Same as Linguistics 301)
Units: (3)

CPRL 305    Contemporary Practices of the World’s Religions

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.B.2. A comparative study of how the beliefs, practices and moral codes of the world’s major religions influence the way nations and individuals behave in the spheres of daily life, culture, ethics, business and politics.
Units: (3)

CPRL 312    The Bible as Literature

Description: (Same as Comp Lit 312)
Units: (3)

CPRL 322    Asian Pacific Americans and Religion

Description: (Same as Asian Amer 322)
Units: (3)

CPRL 325    African-American Religions and Spirituality

Description: (Same as Afro Ethnic Studies 325)
Units: (3)

CPRL 330T    Hebrew Scriptural Studies

Description: Specific areas of Hebrew Scriptures such as major and minor prophets, Psalms, values of wisdom writers, books of the Old Testament. May be repeated for credit with different subject content.
Units: (3)

CPRL 331T    New Testament Studies

Description: Specific areas of the New Testament such as the Synoptic Gospels, the Pauline Corpus, the Johannine Corpus, etc. May be repeated for credit with different subject matter.
Units: (3)

CPRL 335    Judaism, Christianity and Islam Compared

Description: A comparative study of the three great monotheistic traditions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; their beliefs, practices, and structures.
Units: (3)

CPRL 337    American Indian Religions and Philosophy

Description: (Same as Afro Ethnic Studies 337)
Units: (3)

CPRL 345A    History and Development of Early Christian Thought

Description: Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Categories III.B.1 and III.B.2. A historical study of the diversity of Christian beliefs, movements, and key figures from New Testament times to the late Middle Ages, including such topics as important creeds and councils, spiritual movements, and central figures such as Augustine and Aquinas.
Units: (3)

CPRL 345B    History and Development of Modern Christian Thought

Description: Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Categories III.B.1 and III.B.2.
Units: (3)

CPRL 346A    History and Development of Jewish Thought: Biblical and Rabbinical Eras

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Categories III.B.1 and III.B.2. A study of the Hebrew Scriptures in their historical context, of the development of rabbinical Judaism and the Talmud, and of Judaism in the Christian and Muslim worlds down to the close of the Spanish “Golden Age” (1150).
Units: (3)

CPRL 346B    History and Development of Jewish Thought: Medieval and Modern Eras

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Categories III.B.1 and III.B.2.  A study of Maimonides’ legacy, the impact of mysticism, the rise of anti-Semitism, the emancipation of European Jews, the Holocaust, Israel’s founding and history, and the contributions of Jews to American culture.
Units: (3)

CPRL 347A    Hindu Tradition to 400 B.C.E.

Description: Prerequisites: Comparative Religion/Philosophy 110 or completion of General Education Category III.B.2. Hindu thought in its earliest period. Subjects will include an overview of Vedic literature, especially its religious content and the major rituals of the early Veda; philosophical developments in the Upanisads or later Veda; and related sacred writings.
Units: (3)

CPRL 347B    Hindu Tradition from 400 B.C.E.

Description: Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105 or 110 or completion of General Education Category III.B.2. Hindu thought after the Vedic period. Subjects will include the beginnings of Hindu philosophies, classical Hindu practice, devotionalism, modern or neo-Hindu groups appearing in the nineteenth century, and the contributions of thinkers such as Ramakrishna and Gandhi.
Units: (3)

CPRL 348    Philosophy of Religion

Description: (Same as Philosophy 348)
Units: (3)

CPRL 349A    History and Development of Islamic Thought: The Beginning to 1258

Description: Prerequisites: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 250 or equivalent. Islamic theology, law, culture, and spirituality up to the close of the classical period in 1258. Interpretation of the Qur’an, formation of Hadith literature, development of Islamic law, divisions within Islam, rise of mysticism, contributions to science and art.
Units: (3)

CPRL 349B    History and Development of Islamic Thought: 1259 to Modern Times

Description: Prerequisites: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 250 or equivalent. Islamic thought from the close of the classical period to the present, with emphasis on twentieth century developments. Emergence of modern Middle East, reform movements, Islamic response to nationalism and modernity, recent Islamic resurgence.
Units: (3)

CPRL 350T    Major Christian Traditions

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.B.2. Catholicism, Protestantism, Eastern Christianity, or Post-Reformation Communities; historical development and self-understanding, liturgy, creeds, moral norms, canon laws and outstanding figures. May be repeated for credit with different content.
Units: (3)

CPRL 354T    Topics in Buddhism

Description: Prerequisites: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or 280. A historical survey of Buddhist doctrines, schools, and practices in a particular region or regions which are: South Asia, Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, and Southeast Asia. May be repeated for credit with different content. (Same as Philosophy 354T)
Units: (3)

CPRL 358    Comparative Mysticism

Description: Prerequisite: Comparative Religion 105, 110 or equivalent. A comparative survey of mysticism as a recurring phenomenon within major religious traditions. Included are selected writings and representative male and female figures, analyzed from philosophical and psychological viewpoints. Definitions, terms, metaphors, techniques, and stages of the mystical experience.
Units: (3)

CPRL 367    Latino/a Spirituality and Religion

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III B.2. Both national and international expressions of Latino/a religiosity – from popular religion to Marian devotion to curanderismo – are explored through film, historical documents, poetry, theology, art,
Units: (3)

CPRL 370    New Religious Movements in the U.S.A.

Description: Beliefs, history, ritual and organizational make-up of non-traditional modern religions in America, such as Scientology, the Unification Church, Hare Krishna (ISKCON) and Rajneeshism as presented by guest speakers. Discussion of “cult,” “sect” and the occult will comprise portion of course.
Units: (3)

CPRL 380    Religion and Violence

Description: Prerequisites:completion of General Education Categories III.B.2. and III.C.1. Interdisciplinary exploration of major theories, developments and documents connected to the relationship between religious practices and motivations for engaging in, preventing or rejecting violent behavior.
Units: (3)

CPRL 381    Religion and Politics in the United States

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.1. An examination of the relationship of politics and religion, especially in the U.S. The colonial and constitutional experience, Supreme Court decisions on religious issues, the principal theorists of moral discourse in the public forum, contemporary issues of concern. (Same as Political Science 381)
Units: (3)

CPRL 397    Religion and Science

Description: Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.A.2 and III.B.2. An examination of the historical and contemporary interaction of religion and science through a study of religious thought and scientific method. Topics will include the scientific revolution, evolutionary theory and Quantum physics as these relate to religious faith.
Units: (3)

CPRL 400    Religion, the Media, and Contemporary Culture

Description: Prerequisite: American Studies 201 or Communications 233 or History 180 or Comparative Religion 105 or 110. Religion reporting in the secular media; the religious press in America; the influence of the media, both secular and religious, on the shaping of society’s values; ethical dilemmas faced by reporters.
Units: (3)

CPRL 401T    Studies in Religious Texts

Description: Prerequisites: Comparative Religion 105 or 110. The study and interpretation of a selected portion of the scriptures of a particular religion, for example, the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament, the New Testament, the Qur’an, the Veda, the Pali Canon.
Units: (3)

CPRL 405    History of the Jews

Description: (Same as History 405)
Units: (3)

CPRL 406    The Holocaust

Description: (Same as History 406)
Units: (3)

CPRL 417B    Roman Empire

Description: (Same as History 417B)
Units: (3)

CPRL 421A    History of the Christian Church to the Reformation (1517)

Description: (Same as History 421A)
Units: (3)

CPRL 421B    History of the Christian Church From the Reformation to the Present

Description: (Same as History 421B)
Units: (3)

CPRL 425B    The Reformation

Description: (Same as History 425B)
Units: (3)

CPRL 458    Sociology of Religious Behavior

Description: (Same as Sociology 458)
Units: (3)

CPRL 465A    History of India

Description: (Same as History 465A)
Units: (3)

CPRL 465B    History of India

Description: (Same as History 465B)
Units: (3)

CPRL 466A    Islamic Civilization: Arab Era

Description: (Same as History 466A)
Units: (3)

CPRL 466B    Islamic Civilization: Imperial Age

Description: (Same as History 466B)
Units: (3)

CPRL 483    American Religious History

Description: (Same as History 483)
Units: (3)

CPRL 485T    Major Religious Thinkers and Concepts

Description: Prerequisites: fifteen units in Comparative Religion, including Comparative Religion 105 or 110 and 300, and junior standing or approval of undergraduate adviser. Religious thinkers and concepts dealing with Western, Eastern and non-traditional religious ideas from ancient to modern times. Fulfills university upper-division baccalaureate writing requirement. May be repeated with different content.
Units: (3)

CPRL 499    Independent Study

Description: Supervised research projects in Comparative Religion to be taken with consent of instructor and the department chair. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)

 

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