2007-2009 Catalog
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Geography Banner

Introduction | B.A. in Geography
Emphasis in Environmental Analysis
Minor in Geography | M.A. in Geography
Geography Courses
Dept Homepage

DEPARTMENT CHAIR
John Carroll

DEPARTMENT OFFICE
Humanities 420A

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE
http://geography.fullerton.edu

PROGRAMS OFFERED
Bachelor of Arts in Geography
Minor in Geography
Master of Arts in Geography

FACULTY
John Carroll, Mark Drayse, Wayne Engstrom, Gary Hannes, Jon Taylor, Robert Voeks, Barbara Weightman, Robert Young, Lei Xu

ADVISERS
Undergraduate: Mark Drayse
Graduate: Jon Taylor

Geography students

INTRODUCTION

Geography is the study of the earth as the home of humanity. Geography provides a broad understanding of the processes that unite people, places and environments. Geographers explore the diverse regions of the contemporary world in pursuit of global understanding. They tie together the study of human spatial organizations and cultural landscapes with an in-depth investigation of the earth’s landforms, climates and vegetation. Their methods range from fieldwork in foreign areas to advanced information technologies like computerized geographic information systems. Geography graduates find rewarding careers in environmental analysis and planning, business, government agencies and education.

International Learning Opportunities in Geography
The Department of Geography is strongly committed to providing students with an international perspective. Geography 100 Global Geography offers a broad overview of the major countries and regions of the earth. Upper-division courses in Latin America (Geography 333), Europe (Geography 336), Asia (Geography 340) and Africa (Geography 344) offer an opportunity for in-depth study of specific regions. Finally, many other courses (Geography 120 Global Environmental Problems and Geography 360 Geography of the World’s Economies, for example), include a strong international emphasis. In recent years, members of the geography faculty have conducted fieldwork in Asia, South America and Europe.

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BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY
Credential Information
The bachelor’s degree in geography may be effectively combined with subject matter studies necessary for either the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8) or single subject credential (7-12) in social studies. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections for general education, the major and electives. With careful planning, it may be possible to enter the credential program in the senior year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the College of Education (714-278-3352) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation.

The Bachelor of Arts in Geography requires a minimum of 120 units which includes courses for the major, General Education, all University requirements, and free electives.

The major consists of at least 39 units of geography, of which at least 21 units must be in upper-division courses. Students may satisfy some requirements with equivalent course work taken at other institutions. Each course counted toward the major must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher. Students are encouraged to take additional geography courses beyond the minimum required for the major.

Career Emphasis
Geography graduates often find employment in such areas as environmental planning and related technical fields. For this reason, an optional upper-division emphasis in environmental analysis is available within the major.

Major in Geography
The major consists of a total of 39 units of course work.

Lower-Division Core (15 units)
Geography 100 Global Geography
Geography 110 Physical Geography
Geography 160 Human Geography
Geography 281 Map Making with GIS

Three additional units from courses numbered 280 to 289.

Environmental Geography (3 units)
Geography 329 Cities and Nature
    OR Geography 350 Nature and Society

Human Geography (3 units)
Geography 357 Spatial Behavior
    OR Geography 360 Geography of the World’s Economies
    OR Geography 370 Cities and Suburbs

Physical Geography (3 units)
Geography 312 Geomorphology
    OR Geography 323 Weather and Climate
    OR Geography 325 Natural Vegetation

Regional Geography (3 units)
Three units from courses numbered 330 to 349.

Advanced Geography (6 units)
Six units from courses numbered 400 to 489.

Geography Elective (3 units)
Three units lower or upper-division geography not used to satisfy any other requirement.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement (3 units)
English 301 Advanced College Writing
    OR English 360 Scientific and Technical Writing

Capstone Requirement
Prior to graduation, each student must demonstrate a critical understanding of the major processes that shape the earth’s landscapes, regions and places, and that influence human interaction with the earth’s cultural and physical environments. This requirement will be met through satisfactory completion of one of the following capstone courses:

Geography 422 Regional Climatology
Geography 425 Tropical Rainforests
Geography 426 The Coastal Environment
Geography 450 Human Response to Environmental Hazards
Geography 452 Ecotourism
Geography 475 Interpretation of Urban Landscapes
Geography 478 Urban Planning Principles
Geography 488 Land Use Analysis

Units earned from the capstone course can be used to satisfy the Advanced Geography or Geography Elective requirements of the Geography Major.

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Emphasis In Environmental Analysis
The emphasis consists of a total of 39 units of course work.

Lower-Division Core (15 units)
Geography 100 Global Geography
Geography 110 Physical Geography
Geography 160 Human Geography
Geography 281 Map Making with GIS

Three additional units from courses numbered 280 to 289.

Environmental Geography (3 units)
Geography 350 Nature and Society

Human Geography (3 units)
Geography 357 Spatial Behavior
    OR Geography 360 Geography of the World’s Economies
    OR Geography 370 Cities and Suburbs

Physical Geography (6 units)
Geography 329 Cities and Nature
    OR Geography 312 Geomorphology
    OR Geography 323 Weather and Climate
    OR Geography 325 Natural Vegetation

Regional Geography (3 units)
Three units from geography courses numbered 330 to 347.

Advanced Geography (6 units)
Six units from Geography 422, Geography 425, Geography 426, Geography 482, or Geography 488.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement (3 units)
English 301 Advanced College Writing
    OR English 360 Scientific and Technical Writing

Capstone Requirement
Prior to graduation, each student must demonstrate a critical understanding of the major processes that shape the earth’s landscapes, regions and place, and that influence human interaction with the earth’s cultural and physical environments. This requirement will be met through satisfactory completion of one of the following capstone courses:

Geography 422 Regional Climatology
Geography 425 Tropical Rainforests
Geography 426 The Coastal Environment
Geography 450 Human Response to Environmental Hazards
Geography 452 Ecotourism
Geography 488 Land Use Analysis

Units earned from the capstone course can be used to satisfy the Advanced Geography requirement of the Emphasis in Environmental Analysis.

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MINOR IN GEOGRAPHY
The minor in geography serves students seeking a geographic perspective to complement their major. Interested students should take at least 21 units of geography, including Geography 100 and three units from the following (110, 120, 160 or 281) and a minimum of 12 units of upper-division work. All courses counted toward the minor must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher. Faculty advisers are available to help students structure their minor in geography.

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MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY

This program provides advanced study in human and physical geography with an emphasis on theory and research. Graduates are prepared in the application of interpretive and analytical concepts and techniques to a broad spectrum of geographic situations. Such study directly serves those whose careers involve urban, regional, and environmental planning and geographic education. Geographic perspectives and methods are highly applicable to a wide range of careers in business, industry and government.

Application Deadlines
The deadlines for completing online applications are March 1st for the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester (see http://www.csumentor.edu). Mailed applications need to be postmarked by the same deadlines. However, deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the university graduate studies website for current information http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate

Admission and Conditional Classification
The department requires a grade-point average of at least 3.0 in the last 60 semester units attempted and a 3.0 grade-point average in all geography courses. Students who have no, or a limited, background in geography will be expected to make up the deficit by taking appropriate course work in consultation with the departmental graduate adviser.

All students are required to demonstrate competency in each of geography’s four main subfields: human, physical, regional and technical. Competency is normally demonstrated by completion of at least 18 units at the upper-division or graduate level with a 3.0 grade-point average.

Graduate Standing: Classified
After completion of all prerequisites and removal of deficiencies, the student must develop an approved study plan in consultation with a personal faculty adviser and the graduate program adviser in order to be classified.

All students must complete six units of upper-division technical courses. Three units are prerequisite to classified standing. If the remaining three units were not taken as undergraduate work, they may be included in the study plan.

Study Plan
The study plan consists of 30 units of course work distributed as follows:

Required Courses
Geography 500 Seminar in Geographic Research (3)
Geography 520 Seminar in Physical Geography (3)
Geography 550 Seminar in Human Geography (3)
Geography 599 Independent Graduate Research (3)
One additional 500-level geography course (3)

Electives (12-15 units)
Senior-level or graduate course work in geography (15 units unless approved for thesis; may include additional Geography 500-level courses; up to six units from related fields).

Thesis or Comprehensive Exam (0-3 units)
Geography 598 Thesis (3) (department approval required)

Students must follow one of two plans: Plan A requiring a comprehsive examination or Plan B requiring a thesis.

Plan A requires the development of a specific field of interest and a written, three-part comprehensive exam testing knowledge in human geography, physical geography, and the student’s specified area of interest. The examination may be repeated only once. Plan B requires the development of a specific field of interest, a written thesis, and a subsequent oral defense.

All students will follow Plan A unless approval for the thesis option is granted. In order to follow Plan B, the thesis option, students must have the written consent of their thesis supervisor and all members of a thesis committee. Permission to write a thesis may be granted only to students who have (1) achieved a 3.25 grade-point average after 15 units of upper-division and graduate course work and (2) demonstrated proficiency in research and writing skills.

For further details or advisement, communicate with the Department of Geography graduate program adviser.

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GEOGRAPHY COURSES
Courses are designated as GEOG in the class schedule.

GEOG 100    Global Geography

Description: Introduction to world’s geographical regions. Cultural patterns and their evolution in diverse physical environments.
Units: (3)

GEOG 110    Physical Geography

Description: Introduction to the major components of the physical environment including landforms, climate, natural vegetation and soils. (CAN GEOG 2)
Units: (3)

GEOG 120    Global Environmental Problems

Description: Prerequisite: Completion of General Education Category III.A.2. A geographical analysis of the Earth’s principal environmental problems. Subjects include population growth, agriculture and pesticides, climate change, forestry and fishing, energy, endangered species, and appropriate development.
Units: (3)

GEOG 160    Human Geography

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.1. An Introduction to Human Geography. Understanding the regional distribution of language, religion, population, migration and settlement patterns, political organization, technology, methods of livelihood over the earth. (CAN GEOG 4)
Units: (3)

GEOG 281    Map Making with Geographic Information Systems

Description: The principles and practice of effective map making using computerized geographic information systems technology. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

GEOG 283    Introduction to Geographic Information

Description: Introduction to the variety of evidence used in geographic analysis and the sources and techniques for acquiring geographic evidence.
Units: (3)

GEOG 312    Geomorphology

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 110, Geology 101. Landforms and the processes responsible for their evolution.
Units: (3)

GEOG 323    Weather and Climate

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 110. Atmospheric elements and controls, fronts, severe weather, and climatic classification systems.
Units: (3)

GEOG 325    Natural Vegetation

Description: The geography of the globe’s natural vegetation associations. Examines the role of plate tectonics, climate, soils, fire and humans as agents of landscape-level vegetation change.
Units: (3)

GEOG 329    Cities and Nature

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Categories III.A.1 and III.A.2 or III.A.2.b. Overview of the impact of urbanization on landforms, climate, vegetation, and animals. Planning implications and case studies
Units: (3)

GEOG 330    California Landscapes

Description: The landscapes of California, their environmental characteristics, development patterns and current problems.
Units: (3)

GEOG 332    United States and Canada

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.1. The United States and Canada. The interrelated physical and cultural features that give geographic personality to the regions.
Units: (3)

GEOG 333    Latin America

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education Category III.C.1. Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Explores the region’s physical and cultural landscapes. Emphasis on nature-society problems.
Units: (3)

GEOG 336    Europe

Description: The basic physical and human lineaments of Europe. The elements that distinguish and give character to its major regional divisions.
Units: (3)

GEOG 340    Asia

Description: Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.C.1. The physical, human and regional geography of Asia from Pakistan and India through Southeast Asia and the Malay Archipelago to China, Japan and Korea.
Units: (3)

GEOG 342    The Middle East

Description: Prerequisite: completion of the General Education Category III.C.1. Explores the geography of the Middle East from North Africa to Central Asia, with emphasis on the region’s physical, cultural, historical, economic, and political geography and contemporary issues facing the region.
Units: (3)

GEOG 344    Africa

Description: The physical, human and regional geography of Africa. Saharan borderlands, East Africa and Southern Africa.
Units: (3)

GEOG 350    Nature and Society

Description: Prerequisites: completion of General Education Category III.C.1. An exploration of the interface between human systems and natural systems. The course covers a variety of factors affecting human interaction with the earth, including environmental ethics, public policy and technology.
Units: (3)

GEOG 352    The National Parks

Description: The park system and its evolution as related to conservation, preservation, and recreational land use. Cultural heritage and physical environment.
Units: (3)

GEOG 357    Spatial Behavior

Description: A geographic approach to perception and behavior in local and global spatial settings.
Units: (3)

GEOG 360    Geography of the World’s Economies

Description: Geographic perspectives on the global production of goods and services and their distribution to consumers. An exploration of key geographic issues in uneven development, international trade, investment patterns, and the spatial integration of local and regional economies.
Units: (3)

GEOG 370    Cities and Suburbs

Description: American metropolitan systems and city-region linkages. Theories and spatial models of social and economic patterns within cities and suburbs; planning implications of these locational patterns.
Units: (3)

GEOG 422    Regional Climatology

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 323. Major climatic regions of the world; the physical factors that produce climatic patterns.
Units: (3)

GEOG 425    Tropical Rainforests

Description: Prerequisites: Geography 110 and Geography 325 or equivalent. Discussion/seminar examining the geography, ecology, and human use of tropical rainforests. Focus on the causes and consequences of deforestation, sustainable development, and preservation.
Units: (3)

GEOG 426    The Coastal Environment

Description: Prerequisites: Geography 110 and one upper-division physical geography course. An overview of coastal geomorphology, climatology, and plant geography with an emphasis on Southern California. Human interaction, modification, and management of those systems.
Units: (3)

GEOG 450    Human Response to Environmental Hazards

Description: Prerequisites: Geography 110 and at least one 300-level geography course; Geography 350 preferred. Explore issues involved as humans endeavor to minimize the impact of hazards in the environment. Understand the importance of cognition, perception, communication, mitigation, and preparedness as societies cope with hazards posed by the natural world and human action. (Letter grade or credit/no credit.)
Units: (3)

GEOG 452    Ecotourism

Description: Evolution and distribution of nature-based tourism.
Units: (3)

GEOG 475    Interpretation of Urban Landscapes

Description: Prerequisites: Geography 357 or 370 and consent of instructor. A geographic view of the city as a landscape composite of structure, space, place and experience. Emphasis is on the European and North American city.
Units: (3)

GEOG 478    Urban Planning Principles

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 370 or Poli Sci 320. Seminar/discussion on the conceptual themes and legal foundations of American urban planning. Policy areas associated with urbanization and suburbanization processes: land use, economic development, redevelopment, housing systems, neighborhood dynamics and growth management. (Same as Poli Sci 478)
Units: (3)

GEOG 481    Geographic Information Systems: Introduction

Description: Methods and applications of computer-assisted mapping and geographic information systems. Instructional fee. (2 hours discussion, 3 hours lab)
Units: (3)

GEOG 482    Environmental Impact Assessment

Description: Prerequisites: Geography 350, 478, or equivalent. Techniques relevant to environmental impact assessment in accord with CEQA (state) and NEPA (federal) regulations. Systematic evaluation of major environmental impact topics. Individual and small team activities.
Units: (3)

GEOG 484    Urban Planning Methods

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 478 or Poli Sci 478. Seminar and Practicum on methods in urban planning. Analytical techniques and basic data sources. Population forecasting, housing surveys, economic development, fiscal impacts and area revitalization. Individual and team projects. (Same as Political Science 484)
Units: (3)

GEOG 485    Geographic Information Systems: Principles and Applications

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 481 or equivalent. Integrated computer-assisted methods for handling spatial data, including database design, data conversion and updating, information retrieval, analysis, modeling and mapping. Instructional fee.
Units: (3)

GEOG 486    Environmental Remote Sensing

Description: Prerequisite: Geography 481. This course covers the fundamentals of remote sensing science and digital image processing. Focus on remote sensing principles and the processing and interpretation of remotely sensed data using image processing techniques and software.
Units: (3)

GEOG 488    Land Use Analysis

Description: Prerequisite: junior, senior or graduate standing and consent of instructor. Urban and rural land use and settlement; geographic field problems. Application of geographic techniques and tools to local field studies.
Units: (3)

GEOG 495    Internship in Applied Geography

Description: Students work specified number of hours in appropriate public or private organizations under the supervision of their staff and as coordinated by departmental faculty. Interns meet with instructor by arrangement. May be repeated for a maximum of three units of credit.
Units: (1-3)

GEOG 499    Independent Study

Description: Prerequisite: senior standing. Consent of instructor under whom study will be taken required before enrolling. May be repeated for a maximum of six units of credit.
Units: (1-3)

GEOG 500    Seminar in Geographic Research

Description: Prerequisite: graduate standing and consent of instructor. A required seminar to be taken prior to the development of a thesis.
Units: (3)

GEOG 520    Seminar in Physical Geography

Description: Prerequisite: graduate standing Research in physical geography: methods and contemporary themes. Case studies in climatology, geomorphology, and plant geography.
Units: (3)

GEOG 530T    Seminar: Selected Topics in Geography

Description: Prerequisite: graduate standing. Various topics selected from any of the subfields of geography. The topic chosen and a general outline of the seminar are circulated prior to registration. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (3)

GEOG 550    Seminar in Human Geography

Description: Prerequisite: graduate standing. Survey of methodology and case studies including: experiential environments; rural landscapes; urban, social, and economic structure; Geography and public policy; and Third World development. Meets the graduate level writing requirement.
Units: (3)

GEOG 597    Project

Description: Prerequisites: Geography 500 and consent of adviser. 
Units: (3)

GEOG 598    Thesis

Description: Prerequisites: completion of Geography 500, advancement to candidacy and consent of instructor. 
Units: (3)

GEOG 599    Independent Graduate Research

Description: Open to graduate students by consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)

 

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