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Geological Sciences Banner

Introduction | Bachelor of Science in Geology
Minor in Geological Sciences | Master of Science in Geology
Courses in Geology
Dept Homepage


DEPARTMENT CHAIR
David Bowman

DEPARTMENT OFFICE
McCarthy Hall 254

PROGRAMS OFFERED
Bachelor of Science in Geology
Minor in Geology
Master of Science in Geology
Emphasis in Geochemistry (under Master of Science in Chemistry)

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE

http://geology.fullerton.edu

FACULTY
Phillip A. Armstrong, Nicole Bonuso, David Bowman, Brandon Browne, Galen R. Carlson, Diane Clemens-Knott, Matthew E. Kirby, Jeffrey Knott, W. Richard Laton, John H. Foster, Brady Rhodes, Adam D. Woods

ADVISERS

Geology students must be advised before or immediately upon entering the major in order to design an efficient course progression that will meet their objectives. While enrolled, students must meet with an adviser each semester prior to registration for the following semester. The adviser will assist in scheduling of courses, selection of courses, and solving problems should any arise. To be advised, students should contact the department office for available advisers. Special advisers are available for: Geochemistry Emphasis, M.S. in Chemistry (Diane Clemens-Knott); Earth Science Education (Galen Carlson).

Geology field trip

INTRODUCTION
Geological Sciences is the study of Earth through time, including its physical nature, chemical composition and dynamics, as well as its origin and evolution. In addition to the quest for understanding the way Earth works and its relation to the solar system, geological scientists are involved in the search for energy, mineral and water resources, the evaluation and remediation of environmental hazards, and the prevention and/or prediction of natural disasters such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, coastal erosion, and floods. About 60 percent of all geological scientists are employed by private industry, primarily by engineering, environmental, petroleum and mining companies. Others are employed by government agencies, educational institutions and research centers.

Faculty expertise spans much of the breadth of the Earth Sciences, and that breadth is reflected in the curriculum. Faculty research focuses on aspects of Earth’s recent history and the record of past surface environments. Research specialties including seismology and active tectonics, Quaternary geology and geomorphology, hydrology and engineering geology, volcanism and sedimentation, and environmental and climate change reflect this focus. Each undergraduate and graduate student is required to work one-on-one with a faculty member to complete a research project. Thus, through the combination of course work and thesis research, CSUF graduates obtain both breadth and specialization in the geological sciences.

The B.S. and M.S. requirements are designed to help students develop an appreciation and understanding of Earth, as well as to prepare students for (1) employment in industry or government, (2) teaching at the elementary, high school and community college level, and (3) further graduate studies in the geological sciences. The B.S. core is firmly rooted in field-based instruction and culminates in a summer field course; the M.S. core focuses on analyzing primary literature and writing research proposals. Over thirty 300-, 400- and 500-level electives are offered on a regular schedule, enabling students to design individual study plans that satisfy their personal educational goals.

Evening Program
The department offers an evening and weekend program of courses that satisfies requirements for the major with the exception of the field camps. All graduate courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening (with weekend field trips). Consult the department for details.

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BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY
Of the 120 units required for graduation, a minimum of 48 are in geological sciences, 30 in related fields, and 39 in general education courses. The remaining 3 undesignated units are selected to meet the particular needs of each student. To qualify for the B.S. degree, students must have a “C” (2.0) or better in all geological sciences courses applied towards the 48-unit requirement; in addition, students must have a 2.0 average in required courses in related fields. Proficiency in English composition is required.

Undergraduate Thesis (3 units)
In this capstone experience, majors work one-on-one with a faculty adviser on a research project that encompasses all phases of the scientific process, beginning with defining a hypothesis in a written research proposal, collecting and analyzing appropriate data, and writing a report. Students are encouraged to begin research during their junior year. The presentation of undergraduate theses at professional meetings and/or in peer-reviewed literature is strongly encouraged. The Undergraduate Thesis (Geological Sciences 498) satisfies the University’s upper-division writing requirement.

Minimum Course Requirements for the Major
Geological Sciences 101 Physical Geology (3)
    OR Geological Sciences 110T Topics in Earth Science (4)
    OR Geological Sciences 140 Earth’s Atmosphere and Oceans (3)
Geological Sciences 101L Physical Geology Lab (1)
Geological Sciences 201 Earth History (3)
Geological Sciences 303A Mineralogy and Introduction to Petrology (4)
Geological Sciences 303B Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4)
Geological Sciences 321 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy (4)
Geological Sciences 335 Hydrology and Surface Processes (3)
Geological Sciences 360 Structural Geology (4)
Geological Sciences 380 Geologic Field Techniques (3)
Geological Sciences 456 Geophysics (3)
    OR Geological Sciences 406 Geochemistry (3)
Geological Sciences 481A Geology Field Camp I (4)
Geological Sciences 498 Undergraduate Thesis (3)

Upper-Division Geological Sciences Electives (8-9 units)
The Department offers more than thirty 300-, 400-, and 500-level electives that may be applied to the Geology B.S., assuming prerequisites are met. Students choose electives to explore fields of interest within the geosciences, and to develop strengths necessary for their chosen undergraduate research projects and/or post-graduate plans. Electives should be selected in consultation with an adviser. No more than 3 units from any combination of Geological Sciences 493, 495, 496L and 499L can be counted toward meeting this 8-9 unit requirement.

Note: Geological Sciences 310T is not accepted as credit toward meeting requirements for the major.

Related Fields (30 units minimum)
Geoscientists address an extremely wide variety of issues, and their scientific strengths vary accordingly. For example, environmental geology requires strength in chemistry and statistics; seismology requires knowledge of physics, math and computer science; and paleontology requires strength in biology and statistics. The flexible organization of the related field’s requirements enables students and their advisers to select a package of courses that best supports the student in their educational and professional endeavors. At least one of the related field’s tracks must include a second-semester lab course. If the selected related field’s courses total less than 30 units, additional units must be taken from other science-math-engineering departments (see list below). Courses not included on the list must be approved in writing by an undergraduate adviser.

Biology 101 Elements of Biology (3)
    OR Biology 171 Evolution and Biodiversity (5)
    OR a life science course from another institution that is acceptable to CSUF and that demonstrates     treatment of whole-organism biology and concepts of evolution and ecology.
Chemistry 120A and 120B General Chemistry (5,5)
    OR Chemistry 120A General Chemistry (5)
    AND Chemistry 125 General Chemistry for Engineers (3)
Mathematics 150A and 150B Calculus (4,4)
    OR Mathematics 130 A Short Course in Calculus (4)
    AND EITHER Mathematics 337 Introduction to Experimental Design and Statistics in the Laboratory Sciences (3)
    OR Mathematics 338 Statistics Applied to Natural Sciences (4)
Physics 225, 225L Fundamental Physics - Mechanics (3,1)
    AND Physics 226 Fundamental Physics - Electricity & Magnetism (3)
    OR Physics 211, 211L, 212 Elementary Physics (3,1,3), with consent of adviser.

One additional semester course selected with approval of adviser from courses such as the following:

Biology 172, 210, 300, 319
Chemistry 301A, 315, 325, 361A
Computer Science 241
EGCE 301, 324, 436, 441
Geography 481, 485
Mathematics 250A, 250B
Physics 227, 227L, 300, 310, 320, 330

Science- or engineering-based transferable extension certificate courses from other universities.

Undesignated Units (0-3 units)
These are to be taken in geological sciences, related fields and/or career-supporting fields, with adviser approval.

General Education (39 additional units required)
12 General Education units (Category III.A.) are embedded in the Related Fields requirements for the Geology B.S. The remaining 39 units are selected by the student.

See University catalog and consult your adviser for proper course selection.

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MINOR IN GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
A minimum of 20 units in geological sciences courses is required for the minor, of which at least 12 must be upper division, and at least 6 of these 12 must be taken in residence. Up to 3 units of Geological Sciences 3l0T may be applied. Prospective minors should make an appointment with a department adviser in order to select courses that most closely match their educational goals. Prospective teachers should include courses in physical geology, Earth history, hydrology and surface processes, oceanography, mineralogy, petrology, Earth Science for Science Teachers (Geological Sciences 420).

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CREDENTIAL PROGRAM

The bachelor’s degree in Geology may be effectively combined with subject matter studies necessary for the single subject teaching credential in science. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Science Education Program, the department adviser and/or the Center for Careers in Teaching (714-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections for general education, the major and electives. Postbaccalaureate students need to contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the College of Education (714-278-3352) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation and orientation and then contact the Science Education Program (714-278-2307).

GRADUATE EMPHASIS IN GEOCHEMISTRY
The Geochemistry Emphasis is offered jointly by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Department of Geological Sciences. Contact the graduate program adviser in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry for information regarding the Chemistry M.S. requirements and the Department of Geological Sciences regarding the selection of appropriate graduate electives.

GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES COURSES
For all courses, prerequisites may be waived if the instructor is satisfied that the student is qualified to take the course.

Geological Sciences 101, 101L, 102, 105 and 201 are offered each semester. The department offers Geological Sciences 303A, 321, and 380 each fall, and Geological Sciences 303B, 335 and 360 each spring. Geological Sciences 481A is offered each summer, and the remaining courses are offered on a three- to four-semester rotation. A schedule of projected class offerings is available from the department.

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY

The program is based on the assumption that every geologist must have a thorough knowledge of fundamental geologic principles and that this knowledge must be rooted in field- and laboratory-based experiences. No matter how graduating students may choose to apply this knowledge, the sound geologic basis provided by the master of science degree will enable them to meet new intellectual challenges in their future professional or academic careers. The program is sufficiently flexible to meet a student’s interest in the application of geology to the solution of environmental, hydrogeologic or engineering geologic problems facing our society.

The program is designed to prepare students for (a) employment in all fields of geology, (b) teaching at the elementary, secondary and community college levels, and/or (c) doctoral study in the geosciences or related fields.

Admission Requirements
An applicant must meet the university requirements for admission, which include a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution, and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see catalog section on Graduate Admissions for complete statement and procedures). In addition, acceptance into this program in a classified standing is contingent upon the following: (1) a bachelor’s degree in geology from an accredited institution, with an expected grade-point average of 3.0 in geology courses, which normally includes the equivalent to core courses of the Cal State Fullerton Geology B.S. program, and a 2.5 grade-point-average in related science and mathematics courses; or, in the case of a bachelor’s degree in a related area, a selection of science courses deemed as adequate preparation for further study in geology by the Department Graduate Committee; (2) satisfactory performance on the Graduate Record Examination Aptitude Test with an expected score in the 50th percentile or better on the verbal and quantitative tests; (3) two letters of recommendation; (4) completion of the departmental application; and (5) availability of faculty and resources in the student’s stated area of interest.

Students with limited subject or grade deficiencies may be considered for conditional acceptance into the program if they meet all other departmental and university requirements. Conditionally classified graduate standing may be removed upon completion of adviser- and graduate-committee-approved postgraduate courses in geology, mathematics, chemistry or physics, with grades of “B” (3.0) or better.

Students with a degree in a related field and/or substantial subject deficiencies are encouraged to apply. Such applicants may be considered for conditional acceptance if they meet all other departmental and university requirements. Such a student may later qualify for classified standing by completing all courses recommended by the Department Graduate Committee, and by maintaining a 3.0 grade-point-average in geology and in related science and mathematics courses.

Application Deadlines
Financial aid (teaching and research assistantships) are ordinarily awarded only to fall semester applicants. Students who wish to be considered for financial aid must have their application received by February 15th for admission to the following fall semester.
The deadlines for completing online applications are March 1st for the fall semester and October 1st for the spring semester (see http://www.csumentor.edu). Mailed applications need to be postmarked by the same deadlines. However, deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections. Check the university graduate studies website for current information at http://www.fullerton.edu/graduate.

Classified Standing
Students should achieve classified graduate standing as soon as they are eligible, since no more than nine units of graduate work taken before classification can be included on the study plan for the degree (see below). Students may apply for classified standing when they (1) have met all university and departmental admission requirements, and (2) have filed a study plan approved by the adviser, the Department Graduate Committee, and the Associate Vice President of Academic Programs.

Students must meet the Graduate Level Writing Requirement as described in this catalog under “Master’s Degree Requirements.” Students will meet this requirement by taking Geological Sciences 501, Research Methods in Geology.

Advancement to Candidacy
Advancement to candidacy is attained by applying for graduation and receiving a recommendation by the Department Graduate Committee.

Study Plan
A study plan must contain a minimum of 30 units and be approved by the Graduate Adviser. At least 21 units must be at the graduate level; a maximum of 9 units may be 400 level. A minimum grade point average for courses satisfying the study plan is 3.0. The study plan must consist of the following:

Required Courses (9-12 units)
Geological Sciences 500 Advanced Concepts in Geology (3)
Geological Sciences 501 Research Methods in Geology (1)
Geological Sciences 590 Graduate Seminar (1, 1) – must be taken twice for 1 unit each time

Geological Sciences 598 Thesis (3-6)
A public, oral defense of the thesis is required.

Focus and Breadth Courses (18-21 units)
Focus Geology Courses: Graduate adviser-approved 400- or 500-level geology courses. A maximum of 3 units of Geological Sciences 599 (Independent Study) and a maximum of 3 units of Geological Sciences 593 (Directed Study) may be taken. Course selection will be dependent on the student’s academic objectives, and selected in consultation with the student’s thesis adviser.

Breadth Courses in Related Fields: A maximum of 6 units of graduate adviser-approved 400- or 500-level breadth courses offered by departments other than Geological Sciences. Courses may be taken from departments or programs such as, but not restricted to, Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Geography, Civil and Environmental Engineering, or Environmental Studies. Course selection will be dependent on the student’s academic objectives, and selected in consultation with the student’s thesis adviser.

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COURSES IN GEOLOGY
Courses are designated as GEOL in the class schedule.

GEOL 101    Physical Geology

Description: Prerequisite: high school chemistry or physics, or equivalent. The physical nature of the planet Earth, the genesis of rocks and minerals, erosion processes and their effects. (101 & 101L=CAN GEOL 2)
Units: (3)

GEOL 101H    Physical Geology (Honors)

Description: Prerequisite: high school chemistry or physics, or equivalent. The physical nature of the planet Earth, the genesis of rocks and minerals, erosion processes and their effects. (weekend field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 101L    Physical Geology Laboratory

Description: Pre- or corequisite: Geological Sciences 101, 110T or 140. Laboratory on minerals, rocks, earthquakes, and map and aerial photographic interpretation. (3 hours laboratory or field trip) (101 & 101L=CAN GEOL 2)
Units: (1)

GEOL 101LH    Physical Geology Laboratory (Honors)

Description: Corequisite: Geological Sciences 101 or 101H. Laboratory on minerals, rocks, earthquakes, and map and aerial photographic interpretation. (3 hours laboratory and weekend field trips)
Units: (1)

GEOL 102    Earth and Astronomical Science for Future Elementary Teachers

Description: Designated especially for the prospective elementary school teacher, this activity-based course will examine fundamental Earth/astronomical science concepts and the potential impacts of natural hazards on ecosystems on planet Earth.
Units: (3)

GEOL 105    Field Experiences in California Geology

Description: Pre- or corequisite: Geological Sciences 101 or 110T or 140. Students will participate in three field trips that will examine the rich geology of California. Students will read and discuss topical papers and make presentations on selected topics. Weekend field trips are required. May be repeated once for credit.
Units: (1)

GEOL 110T    Topics in Earth Science

Description: Prerequisites: high school chemistry or physics, or equivalent. Focused study of public interest topics in Earth science. Alternating topics include: dinosaur world; earthquakes and volcanoes. Each course will include integrated labs, lectures and field trips that explore mainstream Earth science issues. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, and field trips.)
Units: (4)

GEOL 140    Earth’s Atmosphere and Oceans

Description: Prerequisites: high school chemistry or physics, or equivalent. The composition, structure, and circulation of the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans with a general focus on their interactions. Interdisciplinary topics that highlight atmosphere-ocean interactions will include global warming, ice ages, El Nino, Southern California storms activity, and Santa Ana winds. (3 hours lecture, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 201    Earth History

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101L. Evolution of Earth as interpreted from rocks, fossils and geologic structures. Plate tectonics provides a unifying theme for consideration of mountain building, evolution of life and ancient environments. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips) (CAN GEOL 4)
Units: (3)

GEOL 201L    Earth History Supplemental Lab

Description: Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 101L. Corequisite: Geological Sciences 201. Supervised research on topics related to Earth history. Project will result in a term paper and/or web page. (3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (1)

GEOL 303A    Mineralogy and Introduction to Petrology

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101L, Chemistry 120A; Prerequisite or co-requisite: Geological Sciences 201. Crystallography; origin, occurrence, composition and identification of minerals with emphasis on minerals in rocks. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (4)

GEOL 303B    Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

Description: Prerequisites: Chemistry 120B or 125; Geological Sciences 303A, 380. Description, classification, occurrence and origin of igneous and metamorphic rocks. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (4)

GEOL 305    Earthquake Impact on Structures

Description: (Same as Civil and Environmental Engineering 305)
Units: (3)

GEOL 310T    Topics in California-Related Geology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of one course each from General Education Categories III.A.1 and III.A.2. Directed investigations of one aspect of Earth science. Alternating topics are: geology of national parks, California geology, ocean off California, California earthquakes, geological hazards of California, and California gems and minerals. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (3 hours lecture for 5, 10, or 15 weeks; optional field trip)
Units: (1-3)

GEOL 321    Sedimentation and Stratigraphy

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201, 303B, and 380. Study of sedimentary rocks including classification, texture, mineralogy and provenance; introduction to sedimentary environments and interpretation of ancient environments in the rock record; study of stratigraphic methods and patterns. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (4)

GEOL 322    Paleontology

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201; Biology 101 or 171 or equivalent. Exploration of paleontology, including evolution, taxonomy, ichnology, biostratigraphy, taphonomy, mass extinctions, and paleoecology. Review of the major fossil groups. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 333    General Oceanography

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101L and upper-division standing. The chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 335    Hydrology and Surface Processes

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101 or equivalent, or completion of General Education Category III.A.2. This class explores the impact of surface water on the formation of soils, weathering, surface features (rivers) and groundwater. Application of hydrology as a predictive and postdictive tool on geologic, biotic, and engineering problems.
Units: (3)

GEOL 355    Earth’s Interior

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101; Mathematics 150A; Physics 225, 225L or 211, 211L; Chemistry 120A or equivalent. Geophysical, geochemical properties of mantle and core. Data collection techniques. Impact of internal processes on crustal/surface phenomena.
Units: (3)

GEOL 360    Structural Geology

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 380; Mathematics 125. Faults, folds, mechanics of rock deformation, and elementary tectonics; solution of problems by geometric, trigonometric and stereographic analysis. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (4)

GEOL 376    Engineering Geology

Description: Prerequisites: Mathematics 130 or 150A; Geological Sciences 380 or EGCE 214 and 214L. Geology applied to engineering works. Earth materials, processes; site evaluation techniques; geologic hazard analysis; case histories. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 380    Geologic Field Techniques

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 201; English 101; Mathematics 115 or 125 or equivalent. Use of basic geologic field equipment including the Brunton compass and GPS. In-class and weekend field projects will include: basic geologic mapping on topographic maps and aerial photographs; note taking methods in the field; field data interpretation; preparation of geologic maps for reports; preparing stratigraphic columns and geologic cross-sections; and technical report writing. (2 hours lecture, 6 hours field, weekends)
Units: (3)

GEOL 404    Optical Mineralogy and Petrography

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303B. Principles of optical mineralogy. Use of petrographic microscope to analyze minerals and textures of igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory, field trip)
Units: (3)

GEOL 406    Geochemistry

Description: Pre or corequisites: Geological Sciences 303B, Chemistry 120B or 125, Mathematics 130 or 150A. Basic chemical and thermodynamic principles applied to the origin and alteration of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks and economic mineral deposits.
Units: (3)

GEOL 408    Volcanology

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101 and 303A. Study of volcanic eruption and deposition types, styles and hazards. Class activities and field trips (required) will explore modern and ancient volcanic environments. (3 hours lecture, field trips).
Units: (3)

GEOL 410    Physical Earth/Space Systems

Description: Prerequisites: completion of one course each from General Education Categories III.A.1. and III.A.2. Study of the physical and chemical interactions among major Earth systems (e.g., geosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere) considered within the context of Earth’s position in its solar system and in space. Not available for graduate degree credit in M.S. Geology; available for graduate credit in M.A.T.S in the Science Education program. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity)
Units: (3)

GEOL 420    Earth Science for Science Teachers

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101 and 101L plus upper-division standing or science teaching credential. Major concepts of the earth sciences with primary emphasis on physical and planetary geology and secondary emphasis on meteorology and oceanography. (3 hours of lecture, 3 hours of laboratory, field trips)
Units: (4)

GEOL 436    Hydrogeology

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101L and 335 or equivalent; Mathematics 130 or 150A. Occurrence, movement and utilization of groundwater resources; geological, geophysical and hydrological methods for groundwater exploration and development. Well hydraulics and ground-water contamination. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 455    Earthquake Seismology

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101; Physics 225, 225L or 211, 211L, Mathematics 130 or 150A. Seismic waves, their recording and measurement. Estimation of earthquake source strength, location and mechanism. Introduction to seismic risk and strong motion studies. (3 hours lecture, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 456    Geophysics

Description: Prerequisites: Mathematics 150B or 337 or 338; Physics 225, 225L or 211, 211L; Physics 226, 226L or 212, 212L recommended. Seismic refraction, gravity, magnetic and electrical techniques and fundamentals as applied to determination of subsurface structure, groundwater and location of mineral resources. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 470    Environmental Geology & Planning

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 101L or 420. Geologic processes, hazards, mineral and energy resources and their interaction with planning and environmental regulations. (3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, field trips)
Units: (4)

GEOL 475    Quaternary Tectonics

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 360 and 380. Study of the processes and products of relatively young Quaternary tectonics. Evaluation of surface tectonic features, their ages, deformation styles, and structural regimes. Assessment of past and contemporary deformation rates. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 481A    Geology Field Camp I

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 303B, 321, 335, 360, and 380. Advanced geologic mapping in a variety of geologic settings. Field report, map and cross-sections required. Instructional fee required. (45 hours per week for four weeks during summer)
Units: (4)

GEOL 481B    Geology Field Camp II

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 380 and consent of instructor. Advanced geologic field work in a variety of geologic settings. Field report, map and cross-sections required. Instructional fee required. (45 hours a week for three weeks during summer)
Units: (3)

GEOL 481C    Hydrology and Engineering Geology Field Camp

Description: Prerequisites: Geological Sciences 376, 380 and 436. Geologic mapping and hydrologic mapping and techniques applied to integrated hydro-geologic model for selected areas. Field report(s), map(s), cross-sections required. Instructional fee required. (45 hours per week for three weeks during summer)
Units: (4)

GEOL 493    Directed Studies

Description: Prerequisites: upper-division standing and consent of instructor. Directed studies in specialized areas of the geological sciences, such as petroleum geology, sedimentology, optical and instrumentation techniques. Library research and written reports required. May be repeated once with a different topic. Not available for M.S. Geology graduate credit.
Units: (1-3)

GEOL 495    Geological Sciences Internship

Description: Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in geological sciences. Geological sciences work experience, salaried or volunteer, with industry, government or private agencies. Student intern will be supervised by faculty adviser and employer. (1 hour of seminar per week plus a total of 120-150 hours of work experience)
Units: (3)

GEOL 496L    Geological Sciences Tutorial

Description: Prerequisite: 20 units in geological sciences. Supervised experience in geological sciences teaching through tutoring or assisting in laboratory or field classes.
Units: (2)

GEOL 498    Undergraduate Thesis

Description: Prerequisite: submission of a thesis proposal, signed by thesis adviser. Developed as an extension of an advanced course, conducted independently by the student under faculty supervision, culminating in a paper of professional quality.
Units: (3)

GEOL 499L    Independent Study

Description: Independent study of a topic selected in consultation with and completed under the supervision of the instructor.
Units: (1-3)

GEOL 500    Advanced Concepts in Geology

Description: Current advances in geological concepts with emphasis on Southern California geology. Concepts include: plate tectonics; igneous processes; sedimentary record; surficial processes; water resources. (2 hours lecture, 2 hours activity, field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 501    Research Methods in Geology

Description: Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 500. Introduction to research planning: choosing a thesis topic; bibliographic search; research design (laboratory and field); research proposal preparation. (2 hours activity)
Units: (1)

GEOL 506T    Advanced Topics in Geochemistry

Description: Prerequisite: Geological Sciences 406 or consent of instructor. Special topics on modern techniques and recent advances in geochemistry such as geochronology and environmental isotope geochemistry. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (3 hours lecture; field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 510T    Advanced Topics in Geology

Description: Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Modern techniques and recent advances in geology such as basin analysis, igneous petrology, tectonics, and paleoclimatology. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (3 hours lecture; field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 535T    Advanced Topics in Hydrogeology

Description: Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. Modern techniques and recent advances in hydrogeology such as groundwater modeling, well hydraulics and aquifer analysis, contaminant hydro-geology, hydrogeochemistry, and environmental sampling and protocols. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (3 hours lecture; field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 555T    Advanced Topics in Geophysics

Description: Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Study of selected topics in geophysics. Evaluation of whole-Earth geodynamics; geophysical evidence of large-scale Earth properties; links between earthquakes and plate tectonics. (3 hours lecture/discussion, field trips.) May be repeated for credit once with different topic.
Units: (3)

GEOL 575T    Advanced Topics in Engineering Geology

Description: Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Modern techniques and recent advances in engineering geology such as quaternary geology, landslide analysis, and paleoseismology. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (3 hours lecture; field trips)
Units: (3)

GEOL 590    Geoscience Seminar

Description: Attendance at departmental and other seminars. Discussion and/or written assignments based on seminar topics required. Must be repeated at least once.
Units: (1)

GEOL 593    Directed Graduate Studies in the Geosciences

Description: Prerequisites: Postbaccalaureate standing and consent of instructor. Directed studies of specialized geoscience topics not covered by existing courses and tailored to individual student interest. Literature research, recitations and written reports required. May be repeated for a total of 3 units.
Units: (1-3)

GEOL 598    Thesis

Description: Prerequisites: approval of adviser and completion of M.S. thesis proposal that is approved by the Department Graduate Committee. Design, analysis, and presentation of a research problem culminating in a thesis for the master’s degree. May be repeated once.
Units: (3)

GEOL 599    Independent Graduate Research

Description: Prerequisites: approval of adviser and Department Graduate Committee. Independent research on an approved topic. May be repeated for up to 3 units maximum.
Units: (1-3)

 

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