California State University, Fullerton

Anthropology

DEPARTMENT CHAIR
John “Jack” Bedell

DEPARTMENT OFFICE
McCarthy Hall 426

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE
http://anthro.fullerton.edu

PROGRAMS OFFERED
Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Master of Arts in Anthropology

ANTHROPOLOGY MUSEUM
McCarthy Hall 424

ARCHEOLOGICAL RESEARCH FACILITY
McCarthy Hall 2

ARCHAEOLOGICAL TEACHING LABORATORY

McCarthy Hall 420

ARCHAEOLOGICAL CERAMICS LABORATORY
McCarthy Hall 54

ARCHAEOLOGICAL LITHICS LABORATORY
McCarthy Hall 51

EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY TEACHING LABORATORY
McCarthy Hall 428

CENTER FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC CULTURAL ANALYSIS
McCarthy Hall 422

SOUTH CENTRAL COASTAL INFORMATION CENTER
McCarthy Hall 477

FACULTY
John Bock, Brenda Bowser, Robey Callahan, Barbra Erickson, Peter Fashing, Tricia Gabany-Guerrero, Steven James, Sara Johnson, Joseph Nevadomsky, Nga Nguyen, Susan Parman, John Patton, Carl Wendt

ADVISERS
Undergraduate: all tenure-track faculty
Graduate: Barbra Erickson

INTRODUCTION
Anthropology is the scientific and humanistic study of humans, our ancestors and our nonhuman primate relatives. Anthropologists are interested in a wide range of human activities, including communication and language, economics, political organization, religion, the arts, philosophy, education, health and nutritional practices, social organization, marriage, child rearing and development, science and technology. Anthropology fosters the study of people from all over the world as they live now, and in the prehistoric and historic past. A major goal of anthropology is to understand people living in relationship with their environment. Through an integrative analysis of evolution, adaptation and variation in terms of biology, culture, language and behavior, anthropologists understand the totality of the human experience. In our department, the four subfields of anthropology are emphases on: application of evolutionary theory to understanding behavioral and physiological interaction with their ecological, social and cultural contexts; cultural practices and beliefs; development and use of language and symbols; and evidence regarding these areas from past times. Faculty also focus on areas such as primate conservation, cultural resource management and applied anthropology. The Department of Anthropology endorses UPS 230.000, Statement of Professional Responsibility, and UPS 100.006, A Commitment to Civility at CSUF.
The major in Anthropology is designed to prepare students for advanced degrees in Anthropology, as well as for positions in the private and public sector. Social service, marketing research, museum work, health professions, cultural resources management, primate conservation and international development are some of the areas that offer many opportunities for anthropology graduates.

International Aspects of Anthropology
Anthropology is inherently international in scope, drawing on worldwide, cross-cultural comparisons for understanding culture and what it means to be human. We offer an inter-disciplinary perspective to promote an understanding of globalization and transnationalism. The department encourages study in different cultures and will provide, where appropriate, academic credit for participation in academic programs and supervised research abroad.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY

The Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology requires a minimum of 120 units, which includes courses for the major, all other university requirements and free electives. The major requires 45 units consisting of core courses, upper-division courses and elective coursework. A “C” (2.0) average and a grade of “C–” (1.7) or better is required in all courses applied to the major. Anthro 480 and 481 fulfill the university’s upper-division writing requirement for Anthropology, and each must be passed with a “C” (2.0) or better.

Core Courses (15 units)
Anthro 101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
Anthro 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
Anthro 103 Introduction to Archaeology (3)
Anthro 480 History of Anthropology (3)
Anthro 481 Contemporary Anthropology (3)

Upper-Division Courses (9-30 units)*
Any 400-level course in anthropology is an upper-division course that may be applied to the major, including;
Anthro 400 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
Anthro 401 Ethnographic Field Methods (3)
Anthro 402 Museum Studies (3)
Anthro 403 Archaeological Fieldwork (3)
Anthro 404 Analytical Methods in Archaeology (3)
Anthro 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3)
Anthro 407 Anthropological Video Production (3)
Anthro 408 Ethnogerontology (3)
Anthro 409 Applied Anthropology (3)
Anthro 410 Anthropology of Organizations (3)
Anthro 412 Culture Change (3)
Anthro 414 Economic Anthropology (3)
Anthro 415 Anthropology of Tourism (3)
Anthro 416 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
Anthro 417 Life Quests (3)
Anthro 418 GIS and Archaeology (3)
Anthro 419 Anthropology of Risk (3)
Anthro 430 Archaeology of Household Space (3)
Anthro 420 Visual Anthropology (3)
Anthro 423 The Ancient Maya (3)
Anthro 424 The Aztecs and Their Predecessors (3)
Anthro 426 Archaeology of the Southwest (3)
Anthro 427 Archeology of Settlement Patterns (3)
Anthro 428 Prehistoric North America (3)
Anthro 429 Archaeology of Inequality (3)
Anthro 441 Human Variation (3)
Anthro 442 Medical Anthropology (3)
Anthro 443 Advanced Topics in Human Osteology (3)
Anthro 445 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
Anthro 451 Advanced Human Evolution (3)
Anthro 452 Paleoanthropology (3)
Anthro 453 Human Evolutionary Anatomy (3)
Anthro 454 Great Ape Conservation (3)
Anthro 455 Behavioral Observation (3)
Anthro 460 Public Archaeology (3)
Anthro 461 California Archaeology (3)
Anthro 463 Archaeofaunal Analysis (3)
Anthro 470 Survey of Anthropological Films (3)
Anthro 476 Archaeological Investigations (3)
Anthro 490T Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology (3)
Anthro 491 Internship in Anthropology (3)
Anthro 497 Cultural Investigations (3)
Anthro 498 Museum Practicum (3)
Anthro 499 Independent Study (3)

Electives (0-21 units)
Any 100- or 300-level course in anthropology may be used by majors as electives, including:
Anthro 100 Non-Western Cultures and the Western Tradition (3)
Anthro 110 Ancient Peoples of the American Southwest (3)
Anthro 300 Language and Culture (3)
Anthro 301 Primate Behavior (3)
Anthro 304 Traditional Cultures of the World (3)
Anthro 305 Anthropology of Religion (3)
Anthro 306 Culture and Art (3)
Anthro 308 Culture and Aging: Anthropological Gerontology (3)
Anthro 310 Urban Anthropology (3)
Anthro 311 Culture and Communication (3)
Anthro 313 Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology (3)
Anthro 315 Culture and Nutrition (3)
Anthro 316 Anthropology of Sex and Gender (3)
Anthro 320 Cultures of Europe (3)
Anthro 321 Peoples of Native North America (3)
Anthro 322 Human Behavioral Ecology (3)
Anthro 325 Peoples of South America (3)
Anthro 327 Origins of Civilization (3)
Anthro 328 Peoples of Africa (3)
Anthro 329 Peoples of the Caribbean (3)
Anthro 332 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3)
Anthro 333 Anthropology of Childhood (3)
Anthro 340 Peoples of Asia (3)
Anthro 342 Anthropology and Health (3)
Anthro 343 Human Osteology (3)
Anthro 344 Human Evolution (3)
Anthro 345 Peoples of the Middle East and North Africa (3)
Anthro 347 Peoples of the Pacific (3)
Anthro 350 Culture and Education (3)
Anthro 360 Contemporary American Culture (3)
Anthro 370 Anthropology of Non-Western Films (3)

Under certain circumstances, with the approval of the adviser or department chair, up to six units may be accepted from related disciplines.

Multiple and/or Single Subject Credential Information
The Anthropology degree may be effectively combined with subject matter studies for either the multiple subject credential (K-8) or single subject credential (7-12) in Social Science. Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center for Careers in Teaching (657-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections for general education, major and electives. With careful planning, it may be possible to enter the credential program in the senior year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the College of Education (657-278-3352) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation.

MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY
Twenty-one units must be taken to fulfill requirements for a minor.

Core Courses (15 units)**
Anthro 101 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
Anthro 102 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
Anthro 103 Introduction to Archaeology (3)
Anthro 480 History of Anthropology (3)
Anthro 481 Contemporary Anthropology (3)

Additional Courses (6 units)
Six units of 300- or 400-level courses in anthropology.

MASTER OF ARTS IN ANTHROPOLOGY
The program offers advanced study of general anthropology, while simultaneously encouraging specialization in one (or more) of the anthropological subdisciplines: archaeology; cultural anthropology; anthropological linguistics; and evolutionary anthropology. Opportunities for field and laboratory research, and other related learning experiences permit students to enlarge upon formal classroom training and work independently with original data. Students may pursue a thesis or project of either a traditional or more exploratory character. Efforts are made to assist individuals to plan programs that will meet their individual needs and interests.

Application Deadlines and Procedure
The deadlines for completing online applications are March 1 for the fall semester and Oct. 1 for the spring semester (see http://www.csumentor.edu). Mailed applications need to be postmarked by the same deadlines. However, deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections.
There are two steps in the application process: (1) apply online to the university (see http://www.csumentor.edu); and (2) apply to the department, in care of the Graduate Program Adviser (see http://anthro.fullerton.edu/Grad.htm). Arrange to have two letters of recommendation sent to the Graduate Program Adviser. Please check with the graduate adviser for department deadlines.|

Prerequisites
An applicant must meet the university requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing. The university requires a baccalaureate from an accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted (see section of this catalog on admission of graduates for complete statement and procedures). Admission is contingent upon evaluation and acceptance by the Graduate Affairs Committee.
The Department of Anthropology requires a grade-point average of 3.0 in all undergraduate coursework in anthropology. Students with limited subject or grade deficiencies may be considered for admission to the program if they agree to complete, with at least a “B” (3.0) average, additional courses selected by the Graduate Study Committee. Subject deficiencies must be met prior to candidacy. Students entering the MA program from other fields or other departments of anthropology should discuss appropriate course substitution with the graduate adviser. The department does not permit substitutions for the core courses.

Classification
A student who meets the requirements for conditionally classified graduate standing, as well as the following requirements, will be granted classified graduate standing upon the development of an approved study plan:

  1. A bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 27 units in anthropology, including the following courses or their equivalents
    Core Courses (15 units)
    Anthro 101, 102, 103, 480 and 481
    Additional upper-division courses (12 units)
    Reading courses and special examinations may be substituted for the additional upper-division coursework in Anthropology.
  2. A GPA of “B” (3.0) for all work taken in Anthropology
  3. Classification review administered by the graduate adviser

Study Plan
The 30-unit study plan for the degree must include the following:
Anthro 511 Theory and Method in Biological Anthropology (3)
Anthro 512 Theory and Method in Archeology (3)
Anthro 513 Theory and Method in Cultural/Linguistic Anthropology (3)
Anthro 597 Project (6) or Anthro 598 Thesis (6)
Anthro 504T Graduate seminars in Anthropology, minimum of three (9 units)

Electives – two courses (6 units). Electives may be additional 504T
seminars, Anthro 599 Independent Study or 400-level courses.

For continuation in the program, a “B” (3.0) average, with no grade below “C” (2.0) must be maintained for all work in the study plan.

Students must remain continuously enrolled, either by enrolling in at least one Anthropology course each semester or by enrolling in Graduate Studies 700. Students may request a waiver of this requirement for one or two semesters if professional purposes require absence from campus. A student who is not continuously enrolled will be required to apply for readmission to the program.

A thesis or a project, including an oral examination, must be completed for the degree.

The progress of graduate students will be reviewed prior to classification and again before advancement to candidacy. Students must demonstrate competence in a foreign language or quantitative methods.
For further information, consult the Anthropology graduate program adviser. See also the Department of Anthropology’s website (http://anthro.fullerton.edu).

ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES
Courses are designated as ANTH in the class schedule.

ANTH 100    Non-Western Cultures and the Western Tradition

Description: Changing views of people, nature and culture in Western civilization as related to the impact of non-Western influences, including the use and interpretation of data on non-Western peoples and cultures. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 101    Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Description: Humans as biological organisms from an evolutionary perspective. Concepts, methods, findings and issues in the study of the Order primates, including the relationships among fossil monkeys, apes and humans, and the significance of genetic diversity in modern populations.
Units: (3)

ANTH 102    Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

Description: Nature of culture and its significance. Similarities and differences in human cultures. Analyses of family, economy, subsistence, religion, art and other aspects of culture in diverse societies. Central problems of cultural comparison and interpretation. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 103    Introduction to Archaeology

Description: Relationship of archaeology, culture history and process, field methods and analysis of archaeological data; uses and abuses of archaeology. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 110    Ancient Peoples of the American Southwest

Description: Introductory-level exploration of the lifeways of prehistoric peoples of the American Southwest as evidenced through archaeological remains and through Native American perspectives.
Units: (3)

ANTH 300    Language and Culture

Description: Prerequisite: completion of General Education (G. E.) Category III.C.1. Language as a factor in culture. Trends in the study of language and culture. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 301    Primate Behavior

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 101,102, Psychology 101 or completion of G. E. Category III.A.2. Anthropological study of the behavior of primates, including monkeys and apes with data collection in the wild and the laboratory; review and discussion of behavioral characteristics that are part of the primate heritage of humankind. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 304    Traditional Cultures of the World

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.B.2. Comparative, worldwide survey of traditional, selected and well-studied ways of life using ethnographic writings and films. Examines diverse ways of life, with an emphasis on small-scale societies. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 305    Anthropology of Religion

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.B.2. Beliefs and practices in the full human variation of religious phenomena, with an emphasis on primitive religions. Forms, functions, structures, symbolism, and history and evolution of religious systems. One or more sections offered as televised course.
Units: (3)

ANTH 306    Culture and Art

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.B.2. Metaphysical and mystical systems underlying the “grammars” of the art, myths and rituals of various nonliterate and literate peoples and their development into creative experiences.
Units: (3)

ANTH 308    Culture and Aging: Anthropological Gerontology

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Anthropological discourse on diverse cultural conceptions of aging as they relate to gender, class, ethnic and religious categories. Cross-cultural comparison of culturally patterned time-table of life-cycle and age-grades for understanding the universals and variability in human aging.
Units: (3)

ANTH 310    Urban Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Cross-cultural investigation of similarities and differences in urbanism with an emphasis on current theoretical and methodological perspectives in the study of urban social and cultural forms and processes.
Units: (3)

ANTH 311    Culture and Communication

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.B.2. How meanings are created, exchanged and interpreted in both traditional and modern cultures through language, myth and religion, art and architecture, and other means of communication.
Units: (3)

ANTH 313    Culture and Personality: Psychological Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Relationship of culture to the individual. Child-training in non-western cultures. Survey of concepts, studies and research techniques in psychological anthropology.
Units: (3)

ANTH 315    Culture and Nutrition

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 101, 102 or equivalent. Interrelationships among human nutrition, basic food resources, individual development and socio-cultural organization; assessment of student’s nutritional status, beliefs and practices relative to other cultures. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 316    Anthropology of Sex and Gender

Description: Prerequisites: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Human sex and gender roles in cross-cultural perspective and the role that gender plays in human social organization. Topics include cultural construction of gender; homosexuality, rights of women, evolution and gender. One or more sections offered online. (Same as Women’s Studies 316)
Units: (3)

ANTH 320    Cultures of Europe

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Cultural survey of Europe, focusing on the peasant, national and pan-European traditions of Europe. Diverse anthropological approaches are used to examine changing boundaries of European identity from prehistory to the present “European Union.” One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 321    Peoples of Native North America

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Native peoples of North America; origins, languages, culture areas, cultural history; the impact of European contacts.
Units: (3)

ANTH 322    Human Behavioral Ecology

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.A.2.c. Using modern evolutionary theory, students will examine human biological and cultural diversity through an analysis of comparative socioecology. Topics covered include reproduction and marriage, the family, childhood, population growth, and conservation. Computer labs utilizing eHRAF. One or more sections offered online. (Same as Biology 322.)
Units: (3)

ANTH 325    Peoples of South America

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Cultural survey of South America. Representative cultural areas before and after contacts with Western countries.
Units: (3)

ANTH 327    Origins of Civilizations

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.A.2. or III.C.1. Development of civilization in the Old and New Worlds in primary centers such as Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus Valley, China, Mesoamerica and Peru, and secondary centers such as the Aegean and Europe. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 328    Peoples of Africa

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Cultural survey of Africa. Description of selected cultures and aspects of culture before and after contact with non-Africans.
Units: (3)

ANTH 329    Peoples of the Caribbean

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Various ethnic groups of the Caribbean, focusing on the description and interpretation of African, European, Asian and Amerindian cultural elements.
Units: (3)

ANTH 332    Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.A.2. or III.C.1. Cross-cultural comparison of beliefs, values, expectations and socially defined roles for women in diverse societies. Changing role of women in industrial societies.
Units: (3)

ANTH 333    Anthropology of Childhood

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.A.2 or III.C.1. Using a biocultural perspective, examines the form and experiences of childhood using a comparative, evolutionary, cross-cultural approach. Topics: work and play; evolutionary and cultural influences on children’s development trajectories; role of children. Computer labs with eHRAF.
Units: (3)

ANTH 340    Peoples of Asia

Description: Prerequisites: completion of G. E. Categories III.A.2. and III.C.1. Asian civilizations and cultural traditions: personality configurations in different culture areas; structure of Asian civilizations; and peasant, tribal and ethnic groups of Asia. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 342    Anthropology and Health

Description: Prerequisites: completion of G. E. Category III.A.2 and III.C.1. Uses an evolutionary, comparative, and cross-cultural perspective to understand the process and conception of health in different times, places and societies. Topics include evolutionary medicine, health beliefs, health ecology, culture and health. One or more sections offered online. Computer labs utilizing eHRAF.
Units: (3)

ANTH 343    Human Osteology (formerly 405)

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or equivalent. Techniques in basic identification of human skeletal remains. Aging, sexing, racing and stature reconstruction. For those interested in archaeology, hominid evolution and/or forensic science. One or more sections offered online. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 344    Human Evolution

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 101 or completion of G. E. Category III.A.2. Advanced primate evolution; the origin of Homo sapiens as evidenced in the fossil record and through biochemical and molecular studies. Evolutionary theory and problems in human evolution. One or more sections offered online. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 345    Peoples of the Middle East and North Africa

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Interrelationship between culture, economy, political structure and belief system of selected cultures in the Middle East and North Africa.
Units: (3)

ANTH 347    Peoples of the Pacific

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Indigenous peoples and cultures of the Pacific Islands, including Tahiti, Hawaii and Australia. Forces and processes contributing to social change in island communities and current problems being faced by them. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 350    Culture and Education

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Transmission of values, implicit cultural assumptions and the patterning of education in cross-cultural perspective. American culture and development problems.
Units: (3)

ANTH 360    Contemporary American Culture

Description: Prerequisite: completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Application of anthropological methods, categories of analysis and types of interpretation to American culture. Survey and critique of selected community studies and other kinds of relevant research.
Units: (3)

ANTH 370    Anthropology of Non-Western Films

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 100, 102 or 304. Comparative analytical study of commercial and non-commercial films and videos made by non-western people. Films and videos considered as cultural artifacts that are particularly revealing of the ways people conceive of themselves and their cultures.
Units: (3)

ANTH 400    Qualitative Methods in Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Qualitative methods used in the systematic analysis of culture; diverse methodologies used in various frameworks, including, but not limited to, semiotic, phenomenological and interpretive anthropology.
Units: (3)

ANTH 401    Ethnographic Field Methods

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 102 and six additional units of anthropology. Anthropological field research by students on various problems using participant observation techniques.
Units: (3)

ANTH 402    Museum Science

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 101, 102 or 103. Methods, principles and techniques used in natural history, and small scientific and historical museums. Subjects covered include scope of exhibit and research collections, care and repair of specimens, acquisitions, storage and preparation of presentations in anthropological, historical, biological and paleontological museums.
Units: (3)

ANTH 403    Archaeological Fieldwork

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 102 or 103 and consent of instructor. Excavation of a local archaeological site. Archaeological mapping, photography and recording. Laboratory methods of cataloging, preservation, description and interpretation of archaeological materials. Saturday field sessions. May be repeated once for credit as an elective. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 404    Analytical Methods in Archaeology

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 103, 403. Employment of physical data-collecting techniques (e.g., photographic, paleomagnetic) in the field and the analysis of artifact collections and data from previous field operations in the laboratory. May be repeated once for credit as an elective. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 406    Descriptive Linguistics

Description: (Same as Linguistics 406)
Units: (3)

ANTH 407    Anthropological Video Production

Description: Prerequisite: six upper-division units of anthropology. Planning, shooting and editing videotapes relating to all sub-disciplines of anthropology. (1 hour lecture; 6 hours laboratory activities, demonstrations, and fieldwork)
Units: (3)

ANTH 408    Ethnogerontology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Methods of ethnoscience and interpretive semiotics for analyzing cultural knowledge and domains pertaining to aging. Training in ethnographic cultural analysis of aging for the production of ethnographies that focus on the symbols, taxonomies, paradigms, and themes of aging.
Units: (3)

ANTH 409    Applied Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Uses of anthropological skills and sensitivities in approaching contemporary human problems. Cultural change, organizational development, program planning and evaluation, the consultant’s role and professional ethics.
Units: (3)

ANTH 410    Anthropology of Organizations

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Cross-cultural examination of the diverse ways humans organize themselves in groups. Topics include voluntary and non-voluntary associations, gender- and age-based organizations, religious groups, environmental groups, health care organization and business organizations.
Units: (3)

ANTH 412    Culture Change

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Interrelations between cultural, social and psychological processes in the dynamics of culture growth and change. Impact of western technology on tribal and peasant societies. Anthropological contributions to the planning of directed sociocultural change in selected areas.
Units: (3)

ANTH 414    Economic Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Ethnology and ethnography of economic life, principally in non-Western societies; operation of systems of production and distribution within diverse cultural contexts. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 415    Anthropology of Tourism

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Tourism and travel as cultural practices. Domestic and international tourism; perspective of hosts and travelers; global economy and tourism; souvenirs, artifacts and symbolic landscapes; tourism as pilgrimage.
Units: (3)

ANTH 416    Anthropological Linguistics

Description: Nature and functions of language; language structure and change; classification of languages; use of linguistic evidence in anthropology. (Same as Linguistics 416)
Units: (3)

ANTH 417    Life Quests

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102. Contemporary ways to wisdom and humanness in cross-cultural and historical perspectives. New and comparative approaches to understanding the life cycle, development and fulfillment of individual personalities.
Units: (3)

ANTH 418    GIS and Archaeology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 103 or equivalent course and junior or senior standing. Introduction to the use of Geographic Information Systems as they apply to the study of archaeology. Spatial analysis of past cultural remains from anthropological perspectives. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 419    Anthropology of Risk

Description: Prerequisites: upper-division standing and Anthro 101, 102, 103. Ecological context of risk, cultural and behavioral responses to resource insecurity, the culture construction of risk, health outcomes in relation to risk-prone and risk-averse behavior, and social differentiation and risk.
Units: (3)

ANTH 420    Visual Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 100, 101, 102, 103 or equivalent. Development of the field of visual anthropology and the changing and diverse approaches to the use of visual media in representing and interpreting other cultures.
Units: (3)

ANTH 423    The Ancient Maya

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 102, 103. Archaeology and ethnohistory of the Maya area of Southern Mesoamerica. Problems of initial settlement of the area and the “rise” and dynamics of ancient Maya civilization.
Units: (3)

ANTH 424    The Aztecs and Their Predecessors

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 102, 103. Archaeological survey of principal Mesoamerica pre-Columbian cultures north and west of the Maya area. Aztecs and their predecessors, religion, art, architecture, intellectual achievements and the Olmec heritage. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 426    Archaeology of the Southwest

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro103. Archaeological ruins of the American Southwest – remains of ancient pueblos and cliff dwellings. Prehistory, ethnohistory and ethnographic record of ancient and contemporary Native American peoples of the Southwest over the past 11,000 years.
Units: (3)

ANTH 427    Archeology of Settlement Patterns

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 103. Introduction to settlement pattern studies in archaeology. Dispersion of aggregates and households within communities, and communities within regions, as a way to study political, social and economic organization in past societies.
Units: (3)

ANTH 428    Prehistoric North America

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 103. Change, development and diversity of adaptations of North American Indian cultures prior to European colonization. Uses archaeological data to describe and explain long-term processes of cultural change during ancient times in North America. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 429    Archaeology of Inequality

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or 103. Development of hereditary inequality in non-state societies and the processes by which inequalities become institutionalized. Range of theoretical approaches used to study social inequality, focusing specifically on archaeological contributions and the archaeological correlates of social inequality.
Units: (3)

ANTH 430    Archaeology of Household Space

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 103. Households, domestic architecture and use of space in the archaeological and ethnographic record from diverse theoretical and methodological perspectives. Topics include cultural difference in residential dwellings, use of space, residence patterns, households, gender and ritual spaces.
Units: (3)

ANTH 441    Human Variation

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 343 and one of either Anthro 301, 322 or 344. Processes underlying and the theories for the existence of the present variation between and within human populations. Genetics of human populations and the significance of racial classifications. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 442    Medical Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 342. Human health and disease and their relationship to cultural practices, beliefs and environmental factors; histories of various diseases as factors of cultural change; health care delivery systems. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 443    Advanced Topics in Human Osteology (formerly 425)

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 343 and one of either Anthro 301, 322 or 344. Analytical methods stressing morphological examination of human bone in a laboratory setting (determination of human, prehistoric; analysis of fragmented and commingled remains; basic identification and report writing; pathological conditions). For those interested in archaeology, hominid evolution and/or forensic science.
Units: (3)

ANTH 445    Quantitative Methods in Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthropology major or minor and junior or senior standing. Develops skills and knowledge in the application of quantitative methods in anthropological research. Students learn an integrated approach to research design, data collection, data management, and data analysis through hands-on training.
Units: (3)

ANTH 451    Advanced Human Evolution

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 322, 344 or Biology 274. Uses life history theory to examine evolutionary ecology of human behavior. Topics include the human life course, resource acquisition, parenting and fertility. Computer labs utilizing eHRAF. (Same as Biology 451)
Units: (3)

ANTH 452    Paleoanthropology

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 301, 322 or 344. In-depth and detailed analysis of fossil evidence for human evolution using fossil cast material and computer aided virtual models. Modern evolutionary theory used to interpret the fossil evidence and understand hominin phyologeny.
Units: (3)

ANTH 453    Human Evolutionary Anatomy

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 301, 322 or 344. Uses an evolutionary framework to conduct in-depth and detailed examination of the structure and function of human anatomical systems, their interaction, and their evolutionary histories and how those histories affect health in modern populations.
Units: (3)

ANTH 454    Great Ape Conservation

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 301, 322 or 344. Uses behavioral ecology and life history theory to understand issues surrounding conservation of non human primates. Develop theoretical background crucial to understanding the population dynamics and ecological principles driving primate conservation strategies.
Units: (3)

ANTH 455    Behavioral Observation (formerly 475)

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 301 or completion of G. E. Category III.A.3. Prepares students to conduct advanced behavioral observation research from an anthropological perspective. Research design, data collection techniques, ethical and other considerations unique to varied data collection settings, computerized resources and literature resources. Incorporates service learning.
Units: (3)

ANTH 460    Public Archaeology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 103. Analyzes new archaeological methods, current research specializations, and responsibilities of archaeologists, including Cultural Resource Management (CRM). Review of local, state and federal legislation affecting the protection and preservation of archaeological sites and other cultural resources.
Units: (3)

ANTH 461    California Archaeology

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 103. Evolution and development of native California tribes over a 13,000-year time span based on archaeological and anthropological data. Follows a temporal and regional approach covering prehistory, ethnography and early history of native California cultures.
Units: (3)

ANTH 463    Archaeofaunal Analysis

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 103. Method, theory and lab work in analyses of archaeofaunal remains recovered from archaeological sites and reconstruction of prehistoric subsistence patterns and paleoenvironments based on faunal remains. Topics include vertebrate skeletal identification, taphonomy, subsistence studies and quantification.
Units: (3)

ANTH 470    Survey of Anthropological Films

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 100, 101, 102 or 103; 420 recommended. Survey and analysis of the uses of film and video in anthropological research, teaching, theory, methodology. Films are studied for their anthropological content, and as artifacts of western culture, which reveal significant aspects of that culture.
Units: (3)

ANTH 476    Archaeological Investigations

Description: Prerequisite: Anthro 102 or 103. Methodology and practice of archaeological fieldwork. May be repeated for credit. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 480    History of Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 101, 102, 103. Principal contributions of anthropologists 1850-1950; evolutionary, diffusionist, historical, particularist, configurationalist, and culture and personality approaches in anthropology. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 481    Contemporary Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 101, 102, 103. Anthropologists from 1950-present; neoevolutionist, sociological, structuralist, psychological and symbolic approaches. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

ANTH 490T    Undergraduate Seminar in Anthropology

Description: Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Topics in anthropology. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (3)

ANTH 491    Internship in Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: 18 upper-division units in anthropology and/or related fields. Career opportunities. On-the-job training under faculty supervision in museum, industry or governmental service. One or more papers required. May be repeated for credit for a total of six units.
Units: (3)

ANTH 497    Cultural Investigations

Description: Prerequisites: Anthro 102 and 401 or equivalent. Methodology and practice of cultural fieldwork. May be repeated for credit. (1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

ANTH 498    Museum Practicum

Description: Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of instructor. Practical experience in museum operations, using the facilities of the Anthropology Museum. Topics include exhibit preparation, membership and funding operations, catalogue preparation and outreach activities. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of six units.
Units: (3)

ANTH 499    Independent Study

Description: Prerequisites: at least 15 units of anthropology and consent of adviser. Individual research project involving library or fieldwork. Conferences with the adviser as necessary. Results in one or more papers. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)

ANTH 504T    Seminar: Selected Topics in Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate standing or consent of instructor. Topic chosen and a general outline of the seminar are circulated prior to registration. May be repeated.
Units: (3)

ANTH 507    Grammatical Analysis

Description: (Same as Linguistics 507)
Units: (3)

ANTH 511    Theory and Method in Biological Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate standing. Basic theoretical positions and methodological spectrum in biological anthropology.
Units: (3)

ANTH 512    Theory and Method in Archaeology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate standing. Basic theoretical positions and methodological spectrum in archaeological anthropology.
Units: (3)

ANTH 513    Theory and Method in Cultural/Linguistic Anthropology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of undergraduate major in anthropology and/or graduate standing. Basic theoretical positions and methodological spectrum in cultural and linguistic anthropology.
Units: (3)

ANTH 597    Project

Description: Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of project adviser. Completion of a project derived from original field or laboratory research, and/or from library study. Project could also be a museum exhibit, field report or other project. A copy of the approved written component of the project must be filed in the department through the department graduate program adviser. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of six units.
Units: (3,6)

ANTH 598    Thesis

Description: Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of thesis adviser. Completion of a thesis derived from original field or laboratory research, and/or from library study. A copy of the approved thesis must be submitted to the department through the department graduate program adviser, and a copy of the thesis must be approved by the University Graduate Studies Office for submission to the bookstore for binding and microfilming. May be repeated for credit to a maximum of six units.
Units: (3,6)

ANTH 599    Independent Graduate Research

Description: Prerequisite: consent of adviser. Individual research involving fieldwork, laboratory, or library study, and conferences with a project adviser as necessary, and resulting in one or more papers. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)



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*Upper-division, 400-level courses are intended for junior, senior and graduate students. Courses under Electives in Anthropology are 100- or 300-level and may be taken by all students.
** All courses applied to the minor must be passed with a “C” (2.0) or better.