California State University, Fullerton

Linguistics

PROGRAM COORDINATOR
Franz Mueller

PROGRAM OFFICE
University Hall 323

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE
http://hss.fullerton.edu/linguistics

PROGRAMS OFFERED
Bachelor of Arts in Linguistics
Minor in Linguistics
Master of Arts in Linguistics

FACULTY
Juan Carlos Gallego (Modern Languages), Angela Della Volpe (English), Janet Eyring (Modern Languages), Reyes Fidalgo (Modern Languages), Thomas P. Klammer (English), Edith C. Li (Human Communication), Franz Mueller (English), James Santucci (Comparative Religion), Setsue Shibata (Modern Languages) Kazuha Watanabe (Modern Languages)

ADVISERS
Undergraduate: Franz Mueller
Graduate: Franz Mueller

INTRODUCTION
Linguistics is the study of language. Like other rapidly developing fields, linguistics resists simple classification into one of the traditional categories of academic disciplines. As one of the humanities, linguistics is concerned with the historical development of a particular language or language family. As a social science, linguistics may be related to anthropology in describing language as part of culture; it may even be considered a natural science, related to the physical science of acoustics and the biological sciences of anatomy and physiology. As an applied science, linguistics has found many applications in fields as far apart as language pedagogy, speech therapy and computer programming. Finally, linguistics may be considered a formal science in its own right, related to mathematics and logic.

The interdisciplinary aspects of linguistic study are reflected in the organization of the program, which offers a core of general linguistics courses and draws upon linguistically related courses in other departments.
Graduates use the major in linguistics for a liberal arts base in language-related fields. With advanced work, they enter teaching, language research, translation and linguistic field work, as well as such professional fields as law or teaching English as a second language.

The Bachelor of Arts is for students with an exceptional interest in and aptitude for the study of language. The essential relationships between language and thought and language and culture, the structure of modern languages, including English, the historical study of language, and formal techniques and methodologies are the theoretical foundations of linguistic analysis.

The M.A. in Linguistics builds upon a foundation of undergraduate study in linguistics and allied areas, such as foreign languages, English language, anthropology, human communication and related areas in psychology and philosophy. The program emphasizes strong preparation in general linguistics and offers the opportunity to specialize in one of several areas.
The relationship between linguistics and other disciplines and the application of its techniques, findings and insights to such activities as language teaching are treated in interdisciplinary courses and seminars.

Student Awards
Each year the program honors an outstanding undergraduate student with the Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Linguistics. The Patricia Bruner Memorial Award is awarded annually to a student in the M.A. program in recognition of a distinguished graduate project or academic record.

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS
The B.A. in Linguistics requires a minimum of 120 units, which includes courses for the major, General Education, all university requirements and free electives. A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in all courses applied to the major.

Language Requirement
Linguistics majors are required to take two progressive semesters of any two languages or four progressive semesters of any one language.

Core Requirements (15 units)
Linguistics 351 Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and
Phonology (3)
Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3)
Linguistics 408 Syntax (3)
Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3)
Linguistics 430 Historical Linguistics (3)

Electives (18 units)
Two must be from linguistics upper-division courses other than those listed as required above; and four may be selected from linguistics upper-division courses or from the courses listed below:
Child Development 312 Human Growth and Development (3)
English 303 The Structure of Modern English (3)
Modern Languages, any upper-division course (3)
Philosophy 368 First Course in Symbolic Logic (3)
Psychology 415 Cognitive Processes (3)
Students must consult with an adviser in linguistics before establishing their individual programs of study. Other courses in the university may be taken as electives with the permission of the adviser.

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MINOR IN LINGUISTICS
The minor in linguistics provides a solid introduction to the scientific study of language for students in a related major field. Students are required to take: Linguistics 106, Linguistics 351 and Linguistics 406. In addition, 12 units in elective courses, selected with the approval of the undergraduate adviser, are required. It is thus possible to tailor the minor to individual needs in rounding out a course of study in the student’s major area of specialization. A grade of “C” (2.0) or better is required in all courses applied to the minor.

MASTER OF ARTS IN LINGUISTICS
Application Deadlines
The deadlines for completing online applications are March 1 for the fall semester and Oct. 1 for the spring semester (see www.csumentor.edu). Mailed applications need to be postmarked by the same deadlines. However, deadlines may be changed based upon enrollment projections.

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified
Requirements include a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted.

Graduate Standing: Classified
Classified graduate standing requires a bachelor’s degree in Linguistics or a related field from an accredited institution with at least 3.0 GPA in the major courses provided that a minimum of 24 units of upper-division coursework is included.
If the student holds a bachelor’s degree in a major other than Linguistics, 24 units of upper-division coursework in Linguistics with a minimum of 3.0 GPA must have been completed.
Included among the 24 units of coursework must be the following courses or their equivalents:
Linguistics 351 Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and Phonology (3)
Linguistics 406 Descriptive Linguistics (3)
Linguistics 408 Syntax (3)
Linguistics 412 Sociolinguistics (3)
Linguistics 430 Historical Linguistics (3)
A student who has not completed one or more of the preceding four courses may enroll in the required course(s) concurrently with graduate coursework in the program.
If the student lacks the prerequisite number of linguistics courses, they must be made up before commencing the master’s degree program, with at least a 3.0 GPA in such makeup coursework. In the event that the student’s GPA in prerequisite Linguistics courses is less than 3.0, six to nine units of probationary, adviser-approved coursework may be assigned. If the GPA in these probationary courses is 3.0 or better, the student may be classified. Some courses taken to make up qualitative deficiencies may be credited toward the M.A. if completed with a grade of “B” (3.0) or better, and if applicable to the student’s particular study plan. Courses taken to remove quantitative deficiencies may not be applied to the M.A. program.
Knowledge of one foreign language is required (equivalent of Modern Languages 317 course). Students without coursework in a foreign language may demonstrate proficiency by a score of average or better on the MLA-ETS Proficiency Examination for Advanced Students. Work toward fulfillment of this requirement may be taken concurrently with graduate work in linguistics.
Modifications of certain prerequisite requirements may be permitted in exceptional circumstances.
A study plan must be developed and approved for admission to classified graduate standing.

M.A. STUDY PLAN REQUIREMENTS
Descriptive and Historical Linguistics (15 units)
Linguistics 501 Research Methods and Bibliography (3)
Linguistics 505 Phonological Analysis (3)
Linguistics 507 Grammatical Analysis (3)
Linguistics 508 Theories of Syntax (3)
Linguistics 530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3)

Specialized Electives (9 units)
Coursework selected from any one of the following five areas of specialization, including other courses in the university with the approval of the adviser:
Applied Linguistics
English 303 Structure of Modern English (3)
French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3)
French 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3)
German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Linguistics 305 The English Language in America (3)
Linguistics 307 Speech/Language Development (3)
Linguistics 416 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Spanish 466 Spanish Phonology and Dialectology (3)
Spanish 467 Spanish Morphology and Syntax (3)
Spanish 468 Spanish/English Bilingualism and Language Contact (3)
Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
TESOL 509 Advanced Principles of TESOL: Listening/Speaking (3)
TESOL 510 Advanced Principles of TESOL: Reading and Writing (3)
TESOL 515 Pedagogical Grammar in TESOL (3)
TESOL 527 Second Language Acquisition (3)
TESOL 532 Technology and Second Language Learning (3)
TESOL 560 Second Language Assessment (3)
Anthropological Linguistics
Anthro 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Linguistics 416 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
TESOL 500 Fundamentals in TESOL (3)
Analysis of Specific Language Structures
English 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
French 466 Introduction to French Linguistics (3)
French 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3)
French 530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3)
French 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
German 466 Introduction to German Linguistics (3)
German 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3)
German 530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3)
German 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Japanese 466 Introduction to Japanese Linguistics (3)
Japanese 468 Japanese-English Contrastive Analysis (3)
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Spanish 466 Spanish Morphology and Dialectology (3)
Spanish 500 Graduate Seminar: Advanced Structure and Style (3)
Spanish 530 Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics (3)
Spanish 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)

Communication and Semantics
Anthro 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Human Comm 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Linguistics 416 Anthropological Linguistics (3)
Linguistics 417 Psycholinguistics (3)
Linguistics 442 Changing Words: History, Semantics and Translation (3)
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Disorders of Communication
Human Comm 461 Audiology and Audiometry (3)
Human Comm 472 Voice and Craniofacial Disorders (3)
Human Comm 475 Fluency Disorders (3)
Human Comm 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)
Linguistics 307 Speech/Language Development (3)
Linguistics 369 Language, Sex Roles, and the Brain (3)
Linguistics 417 Psycholinguistics (3)
Linguistics 599 Independent Graduate Research (1-3)

Linguistics or a Related Field Elective (3 units)

Linguistics 597 Project (3 units)

A minimum of 15 units in 500-level courses is required. Satisfactory completion of a written comprehensive examination is required at the conclusion of the program. The examination may be repeated only once. A reading list for the examination and specifications for the project are available in the program office.

For further information, consult the graduate adviser.

LINGUISTICS COURSES
Courses are designated as LING in the class schedule.

LING 106    Language and Linguistics

Description: Nature of language, its origin and development; language in culture, the structure of language and its systems of writing and transcription, and its application to other areas of humanistic and scientific knowledge.
Units: (3)

LING 108    Linguistics and Minority Dialects

Description: Sounds, meanings and vocabulary of African-American, Chicano and other English dialects and their historical origin. (Same as Chicana/o Studies 108 and Afro-Ethnic Studies 108)
Units: (3)

LING 206    Introduction to Language Structure and Language Use

Description: (Same as English 206)
Units: (3)

LING 301    Sanskrit

Description: Introduction to the Devanagari script, as well as the phonology, morphology and syntax of the Sanskrit language. A reading knowledge of Sanskrit will be the main goal of the course. (Same as Comp Religion 301)
Units: (3)

LING 305    The English Language in America

Description: (Same as English 305)
Units: (3)

LING 307    Speech/Language Development

Description: (Same as Human Comm 307)
Units: (3)

LING 351    Introduction to Linguistic Phonetics and Phonology

Description: Nature and structure of sound systems in language. Thorough investigation of the International Phonetic Alphabet as applied to many different languages, including English. Language Acquisition (L1) and Language Learning (L2); analytic methods and techniques.
Units: (3)

LING 360    Nonverbal Communication

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 106 or Human Comm 100. Physical actions, gestures and changes in the physiognomy that occur together with language and paralanguage in human communication; substitutions for language and modifications of it in varying cultures. (Same as Human Communication 360)
Units: (3)

LING 369    Language, Sex Roles, and the Brain

Description: How gender socialization is reflected in the structure and use of language and whether gender differences in language are biologically based or a consequence of sex roles.
Units: (3)

LING 406    Descriptive Linguistics

Description: Sounds (phonology), forms and meanings (morphology), and syntax of languages. Examples and problem-solving in various languages. (Same as Anthropology 406)
Units: (3)

LING 408    Syntax

Description: Prerequisite: one of the following: Ling 106, 406 or Engl 303. Sentence structure in human language. Practice in syntactic analysis in a variety of languages.
Units: (3)

LING 412    Sociolinguistics

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 406 or equivalent. Social dialects in relation to the surrounding communities. Social stratification, acculturation, language maintenance, standardization, language planning and language change.
Units: (3)

LING 416    Anthropological Linguistics

Description: (Same as Anthropology 416)
Units: (3)

LING 417    Psycholinguistics

Description: (Same as Psychology 417)
Units: (3)

LING 430    Historical Linguistics

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 406 or its equivalent. Comparative method in diachronic linguistic methodology and theory, graphemics, glottochronology, language families, dialect geography and internal reconstruction. Fulfills the course requirement of the university upper-division baccalaureate writing requirement for linguistics majors.
Units: (3)

LING 442    Changing Words: History, Semantics, and Translation

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 351 or 430. Etymology, related problems of lexicography and translation. Recent developments in theory of semantic change as related to cultural shifts. Emphasizes words, collocations, idioms. (Same as English 442)
Units: (3)

LING 492    Linguistic Fieldwork

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 351 or 406. Methodology and practice of linguistic analysis and language description as practiced in the field. Data collection and processing of a non-Indo-European linguistic structure using native informants. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (3)

LING 499    Independent Study

Description: Supervised projects with consent of program coordinator. Topic varies with the student. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)

LING 501    Research Methods and Bibliography

Description: Prerequisites: graduate standing and Ling 406 or equivalent. Principal books, periodicals and collections in general linguistics, specific languages and related fields; techniques of preparing research papers and field reports in linguistics. Must be taken prior to Linguistics 597.
Units: (3)

LING 505    Phonological Analysis

Description: Prerequisites: Ling 351 and 406. Phonological systems that occur in languages; emphasizes terminology used to describe changes in the system and processes affecting it; problem solving of selected language data.
Units: (3)

LING 507    Grammatical Analysis

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 406. Word formation in a variety of languages with emphasis on the terminology used to describe morphological representation on various levels; problem solving of selected language data. (Same as Anthropology 507)
Units: (3)

LING 508    Theories of Syntax

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 408 or equivalent. Contemporary theories of grammar, such as transformational-generative, with emphasis on theoretical problems in the analysis of language structure.
Units: (3)

LING 530    Graduate Seminar: Historical Linguistics

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 430 or its equivalent. History of language, including principles and techniques for the historical study and classification of individual languages and language families, writing systems, lexicostatistical methods and linguistic geography.
Units: (3)

LING 597    Project

Description: Prerequisite: Ling 501. Preparation and completion of an approved project.
Units: (3)

LING 599    Independent Graduate Research

Description: Prerequisites: graduate standing and consent of program coordinator. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)



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