California State University, Fullerton

Psychology

DEPARTMENT CHAIR
Jack Mearns

DEPARTMENT OFFICE
Humanities 830M

DEPARTMENT WEBSITE
http://hss.fullerton.edu/psychology

ADVISEMENT OFFICE
Humanities 830J

OFFICE OF GRADUATE DEGREES AND UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS
Humanities 835N

PROGRAMS OFFERED
Bachelor of Arts in Psychology
Minor in Psychology
Master of Arts in Psychology
Master of Science in Psychology (Clinical)

FACULTY
Kristin Beals, Michael Birnbaum, Melinda Blackman, Iris Blandon-Gitlin, Barbara Cherry, Russ Espinoza, David Gerkens, Aaron Goetz, Allen Gottfried, Jinni Harrigan, Richard Lippa, William Marelich, Jack Mearns, Mindy Mechanic, Steven Miller, Eriko Miyahara, Lisa Mori, Douglas Navarick, Jessie Peissig, Nancy Ryba, Christine Scher, Nancy Segal, Susan Sy, Jennifer Trevitt, Laura Zettel-Watson

ADVISERS
Undergraduate: Kristin Beals, Melinda
Blackman, Eriko Miyahara, Christine Scher, Joanne Stohs
MA Coordinator: Melinda Blackman
MS Coordinator: Christine Scher

INTRODUCTION
Psychology is a science whose central theme is the study of behavior. Psychology involves studying how we interact with one another and our environment. Psychology is practical; it is concerned with improving our quality of life. To achieve these ends, psychologists work in a broad range of research and applied settings. The psychology major is designed to provide each student with a comprehensive overview of the main fields of psychology and the methods used in psychological research. The major is also designed to assist the student in selecting elective courses that can form a concentration in an area of the student’s interest. These specialty areas might include clinical/community, social, developmental/child/aging, industrial/organizational, learning/cognitive, biopsychology/health psychology and legal/forensic psychology. The major provides a basis for careers in a variety of psychology-related occupations, such as mental health agencies, hospitals, schools, businesses and public organizations. The major also prepares students for graduate training in fields such as psychological research; clinical psychology; marriage, family therapy; teaching; social work; law; business and management; and public administration. The Psychology Department has its own web pages (http://hss.fullerton.edu/psychology) that introduce you to faculty members, describe courses and answer your questions. You may also call the Psychology Department at 657-278-3514.

All students who declare psychology as their major should meet with one of the undergraduate advisement coordinators (Humanities 830J, 657-278-3102) during their first semester to develop a study plan. Students should also obtain a copy of the Psychology Department Student Handbook and Careers for Psychology Majors from the department office. Early consultation with an adviser is especially important for those interested in pursuing graduate training, careers in psychology or related fields, teaching credentials or a double major or minor.
Community College Transfer Students: A maximum of nine lower-division units of psychology courses may be applied toward the 41 units required for the psychology major. The nine units must fit the course description requirements listed in this catalog for Psychology 101, 201 and 202. Additional lower-division units taken in psychology at a community college and approved by the university may be used for university credit for graduation.

Back to Top


TEACHING CREDENTIAL INFORMATION
The bachelor’s degree in psychology may be effectively combined with subject matter studies necessary for the multiple subject teaching credential (K-8). Undergraduates are encouraged to work with the Center for Careers in Teaching (657-278-7130) as early as possible in their academic careers to plan efficient course selections for general education, the major and electives. With careful planning, it may be possible to enter the credential program in the senior year of the bachelor’s degree. Postgraduate students should contact the Admission to Teacher Education office in the College of Education (657-278-3352) to obtain information on attending an overview presentation.

Back to Top

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY
The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology requires a minimum of 120 units, which includes courses for the major, General Education, all university requirements and free electives.
Lower Division (9 units)
Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3)
Psychology 201 Elementary Statistics (3)
Psychology 202 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
Upper Division (32 units)
Required Courses (26 units)
Two of the following experimental psychology courses (6 units):
Psychology 302 Learning and Memory (3)
Psychology 303 Sensation and Perception (3)
Psychology 304 Comparative Animal Behavior (3)
Psychology 305 Cognitive Psychology (3)
Psychology 306 Biopsychology (3)
One of the following laboratory classes (2 units):
Psychology 302L Laboratory in Learning and Memory (2)
Psychology 303L Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (2)
Psychology 304L Laboratory in Comparative Animal behavior (2)
Psychology 305L Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology (2)
Psychology 306L Laboratory in Biopsychology (2)
Two of the following (6 units):
Psychology 331 Psychology of Personality (3)
Psychology 341 Abnormal Psychology (3)
Psychology 351 Social Psychology (3)
Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3)
One of the following (3 units):
Psychology 311 Educational Psychology (3)
Psychology 317 Legal Psychology (3)
Psychology 362 Psychology of Aging (3)
Psychology 391 Industrial/Organizational Psychology (3)
All of the following (9 units):
Psychology 300 Computer Applications in Psychology (3)
Psychology 461 Psychological Testing (3)
Psychology 495 Field Placement in Psychology (3)
Elective 300- and 400-Level Courses (6 units)
To correspond to your career goals and interests, a wide range of 300- and 400-level elective courses is available. These elective courses should be selected in consultation with a psychology department academic adviser.
One 300- or 400-level elective in Psychology (3)
One 400-level elective, excluding Psychology 461, 495, and 496 (3)

Special Requirements
Each course counted toward the major must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher. In addition, the overall minimum GPA must be 2.0 or greater for all units attempted in Psychology courses whether the course is counted toward the major or not; whether upper or lower division; or whether taken at Cal State Fullerton or elsewhere. No more than a total of three units of either Directed Empirical Research (Psychology 498) or Directed Library Research (Psychology 499) may be applied toward the major. No more than three units of Field Placement (Psychology 495) may be applied toward the major. Student-to-Student Tutorial (Psychology 496) may not be used toward the major, but three units of this course may be counted toward units to graduate from the university. A minimum of 21 units counted toward the major must have been completed in psychology at CSUF.

Upper-Division Writing Requirement
To satisfy the course component of the University’s Upper- Division Writing Requirement, psychology majors must complete with at least a “C” (2.0), three courses totaling eight units. These same courses satisfy a portion of the requirements for the major.
Two of the following lecture/discussion courses:
Psychology 302 Learning and Memory (3)
Psychology 303 Sensation and Perception (3)
Psychology 304 Comparative Animal Behavior (3)
Psychology 305 Cognitive Psychology (3)
Psychology 306 Biopsychology (3)
One of the following lab courses:
Psychology 302L Laboratory in Learning and Memory (2)
Psychology 303L Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (2)
Psychology 304L Laboratory in Comparative Animal Behavior (2)
Psychology 305L Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology (2)
Psychology 306L Laboratory in Biopsychology (2)

Back to Top

MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY
Lower Division (9 units)
Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology (3)
Psychology 201 Elementary Statistics (3)*
Psychology 202 Research Methods in Psychology (3)
Upper Division (6 units)
One of the following (3 units):
Psychology 302 Learning and Memory (3)
Psychology 303 Sensation and Perception (3)
Psychology 304 Comparative Animal Behavior (3)
Psychology 305 Cognitive Psychology (3)
Psychology 306 Biopsychology (3)

One of the following (3 units):
Psychology 331 Psychology of Personality (3)
Psychology 341 Abnormal Psychology (3)
Psychology 351 Social Psychology (3)
Psychology 361 Developmental Psychology (3)
Electives (6 units)
*Students who complete Psychology 201, or who have completed an articulated community college equivalent, take 6 units of upper-division electives. Alternatively, students may substitute for Psychology 201 a similar course in their major that is approved by the Psychology Department and take 9 units of upper-division electives.

Special Requirements
Each course counted toward the minor must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0) or higher. No more than a total of three units of either Directed Empirical Research (Psychology 498) or Directed Library Research (Psychology 499) may be applied toward the minor. Student-to-Student Tutorial (Psychology 496) may not be used toward the minor, but three units of this course may be counted toward units to graduate from the university. A minimum of 12 units counted toward the minor must have been completed in psychology at CSUF.

Other Minors
The Psychology Department participates in minors in Criminal Justice, Child and Adolescent Studies, Gerontology, Human Services and Women’s Studies. Some coursework may be applied to both the Psychology major and the minor. Twelve units in a minor must be distinct and different from those in the Psychology major, so, in a 21-unit minor, nine units of Psychology may be double counted to satisfy requirements in both the major and the minor.

Back to Top

MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY
The degree program provides advanced coursework and research training in core areas of psychology. Completion of the M.A. can facilitate application to doctoral programs and provide skills important to careers in education, research, the health professions and industry.

Admission to Graduate Standing: Classified
An applicant who meets the requirements listed below, in conjunction with the development of an approved study plan, may be evaluated for classified graduate standing.
1. Satisfaction of the general prerequisites for graduate studies, which include a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and a grade point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted. Applicants are rarely admitted with less than a 3.0 overall grade-point average.
2. A 3.0 average in psychology coursework.

3. Approved lower-division equivalent courses in psychology:
a. Introductory Psychology (e.g., Psychology 101)
b. Elementary Statistics (e.g., Psychology 201)
c. Research Methods in Psychology (e.g., Psychology 202)
4. Approved upper-division equivalent coursework including classes in history of psychology (e.g., Psychology 408), with a grade of “B-” (2.7) or better (if history of psychology is not completed prior to entering the program it may be completed during the program); and advanced statistics (e.g., Psychology 465), with a grade of “B-” (2.7) or better, completed prior to entering or within the first semester. Also four additional psychology classes completed from the areas below; classes must be from four different areas and one must be a lab class:
a. Learning and Memory
b. Cognition/Information Processing
c. Sensation and Perception/Physiological/Biological
d. Social/Personality
e. Abnormal/Clinical
f. Developmental
5. Satisfactory performance in the General (Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical) and Advanced Subject/Psychology tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
6. Three satisfactory letters of recommendation. One must be from a psychology professor.
7. Meet the University’s Writing Proficiency Requirement.
8. Supervised empirical research experience.
Invitation to the program is based on competitive evaluation of qualifications and is at the sole discretion of the Psychology Department’s Graduate Studies Committee. New students are admitted to the Master of Arts program in the fall only. Both the university and department applications must be completed on time for full consideration.
The deadline for completing online applications to the university is March 1 (see http://www.csumentor.edu). University deadlines may be changed based on enrollment projections.
Departmental application forms may be obtained from http://hss.fullerton.edu/psychology/masterofarts.asp. The deadline for the return of the departmental application form and all supporting materials is March 1.
Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified
It may be possible for an applicant with minimal deficiencies in prerequisite requirements, but who is otherwise highly qualified, to be admitted conditionally to the program. Provisions for the removal of these deficiencies would be outlined as part of the conditional acceptance. Provisions must be made for removal of deficiencies prior to granting classified standing. For further information, consult the graduate program adviser.

Study Plan
The Master of Arts in Psychology requires a minimum of 30 units of approved graduate work, including the completion and acceptance by the department of a written thesis that has been defended orally.
Each student, in consultation with the graduate coordinator, will develop a program of study. This program will be outlined on an official university study plan form and submitted to the department’s Graduate Studies Committee for review and approval. To be advanced to candidacy, students must receive a grade of “B-” (2.7) or better on all study plan courses and maintain a 3.0 grade point average overall.
Requirements for the M.A. in Psychology include the following:
500-Level Courses (15 units)
Psychology 500 Issues and Perspectives in Psychological Research (3)
Psychology 510 Experimental Design (3)
Psychology 599 Independent Graduate Research (3)
Two seminars from Psychology 520T Advanced Topics in
Psychological Research (3,3)
400-level Content Courses (9-12 units)
Three 400-level psychology classes must be completed, each from a separate category:*
Applied Research
Cognitive
Social/Personality/Industrial
Clinical
Developmental
Quantitative
Sensory Processes/Physiological/Biological

*A list of qualifying classes for each category is available from the psychology graduate office.
Thesis (3-6 units)
Psychology 598 Thesis Research (3 or 3/3 units)
Students must complete Psychology 500 within their first semester in the program. To be advanced to candidacy for the M.A. degree, students must have received a grade of “B-” (2.7) or better in all study plan classes and maintain a 3.0 grade-point average overall. A successful oral defense of the thesis is also required.
Following university regulations, a maximum of five years is normally allowed for completion of coursework and other requirements.
For further details, contact the Graduate Program office in the Department of Psychology.

Back to Top

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PSYCHOLOGY (CLINICAL)
The Master of Science program combines training in scientific and applied areas of clinical psychology. It is based on the scientist-practitioner model. It prepares students for professional work in a variety of settings and for doctoral training in academic and professional programs in clinical psychology. The M.S. program provides supervised research and clinical fieldwork experience. Completion of the coursework prepares the student for Marriage, Family Therapy (MFT) intern registration. A small amount of additional coursework must be taken to qualify the student for the MFT license.

Admission to Graduate Standing: Classified
An applicant who meets the following requirements may be considered for classified graduate standing upon development of an approved study plan:
1. Satisfaction of the general prerequisites for graduate work, which include a baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited institution and a grade-point average of at least 2.5 in the last 60 semester units attempted. Applicants are rarely admitted with less than a 3.0 overall grade-point average. (See section of this catalog on Graduate Admissions for complete statement and procedures.)
2. A 3.0 average in psychology
3. A major in psychology* or approved equivalent coursework including the following courses:
Lower Division
Psychology 101 Introductory Psychology
Psychology 201 Elementary Statistics
Psychology 202 Research Methods in Psychology*
Upper Division
Psychology 306 Biopsychology
Psychology 341 Abnormal Psychology*
Psychology 461 Psychological Testing with a grade of B- (2.7) or
better* (completed prior to admission or within the first
semester)
Psychology 465 Advanced Psychological Statistics with a grade of
B- (2.7) or better * (completed prior to admission or within the
first year)
4. Satisfactory performance on both the General and Advanced Psychology Tests of the Graduate Record Examination
5. Three satisfactory letters of recommendation
6. Meeting the university’s Writing Proficiency Requirement
7. Previous paid or volunteer clinical and research experience
8. Completion of a selection interview
New students are admitted to the Master of Science program in the fall only. Those admitted will be selected in the spring from the most qualified applicants, at the sole discretion of the department’s Graduate Studies Committee. An interview of the finalists is required. In addition to the university application, a departmental application form, obtainable at http://hss.fullerton.edu/psychology/masterofscience.asp, must be completed.
The deadline for completing online applications to the university is March 1 (see http://www.csumentor.edu). University deadlines may be changed based on enrollment projections.
The application deadline for returning the departmental application with all materials, including GRE scores is March 1 for fall semester entry. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Admission to Graduate Standing: Conditionally Classified
It may be possible for applicants who have minimal deficiencies in the prerequisite requirements detailed above, but who are otherwise highly qualified, to be admitted with conditionally classified graduate standing. Provisions must be made for removal of deficiencies prior to the granting of classified standing. For further information, consult the graduate program adviser.

Study Plan
The Master of Science in Psychology requires 50 units of approved graduate work, including the completion and acceptance by the department of a written thesis, which has been defended orally.
Students, in consultation with their program adviser, shall develop a study plan that will be submitted to the Graduate Studies Committee of the Department of Psychology for approval. To be advanced to candidacy, students must receive a grade of “B-” (2.7) or better on all study plan courses and maintain a 3.0 grade point average overall.
Core Courses (10 units)
Psychology 501 Professional and Legal Issues in Clinical Psychology (3)**
Psychology 510 Research Design (3)
Psychology 520T Advanced Topics in Psychological Research (3)
Psychology 599 Independent Graduate Research (1)
Clinical Courses (28 units)
Psychology 545 Advanced Psychopathology (3)**
Psychology 547 Theories of Psychological Intervention (3)**
Psychology 548 Psychotherapy Techniques (3)**
Psychology 549 Marriage, Family and Child Therapy (3)**
Psychology 560 Child and Adolescent Treatment (3)**
Psychology 561 Clinical Psychological Assessment (3)**
Psychology 568 Substance Abuse (1)**
Psychology 569 Cross Cultural Psychology (3)**
Psychology 594A Fieldwork (3)**
Psychology 594B Fieldwork (3)**

*Psychology majors are required to ensure that their coursework includes research methods, biopsychology, abnormal psychology, psychological testing, advanced statistics, and supervised research and clinical experience (fieldwork, internship or volunteer).
**Required by Board of Behavioral Science (BBS) for MFT licensure. Please see the program coordinator for additional courses necessary for licensure.

Electives (6 units)
Elective coursework must be approved by the Graduate Program Coordinator.
Thesis (6 units)
Psychology 598 Thesis Research (6)
The M.S. Program accepts full-time students only. Part-time study is not possible. Students must complete coursework in the prescribed sequence. The program involves intensive fieldwork experience in clinical settings, emphasizing careful supervision, which includes weekly meetings with Psychology Department faculty and off-campus fieldwork supervisors.
The Psychology Department’s mentor program facilitates students’ early involvement in research, helps students develop their thesis topics and provides academic and career counseling. New students, in consultation with the coordinator, select a mentor prior to their second semester in the program. Students may change mentors at any time by obtaining the agreement of the new mentor, informing the current mentor and consulting with the Graduate Coordinator. It is anticipated that students’ mentors will serve as their thesis advisers in the second year. However, students are free to select a different person for their adviser.
It should be noted that successful completion of coursework is not sufficient to permit continuation in the program. In addition, faculty judgment must be satisfied with respect to the student’s effectiveness and professional and ethical behavior in dealing with clients. Continuation in the program is contingent upon satisfactory performance in all aspects of the program as judged by the Graduate Studies Committee.

PSYCHOLOGY COURSES
Courses are designated as PSYC in the class schedule.

PSYC 101    Introductory Psychology

Description: Basic concepts, problems and methods in psychology. Perception, learning, measurement, cognitive processes, development, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, physiological and social psychology. Three hours of research participation required. It is recommended that students satisfy the ELM requirement before enrolling.
Units: (3)

PSYC 110    Reasoning and Problem Solving

Description: Nature of critical thinking, models and strategies; common fallacies of reasoning, self-regulation in the thinking process; application of critical thinking to specific areas.
Units: (3)

PSYC 201    Elementary Statistics

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101 and completed ELM requirement. Descriptive statistics, probability, hypothesis testing (t, chi-square, F), sampling distributions of mean and variance, correlation and regression, analysis of variance (one-way, two-way, factorial design), interpreting data. Laboratory applications of statistical software to psychological data. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

PSYC 202    Research Methods in Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201 and completed ELM requirement, and completion of a G.E.-certified college composition course; concurrent enrollment in Psych 201 may be allowed by consent of instructor. Fundamentals of psychological research methods. Participation in conducting experiments, analyzing data, interpreting results and writing research reports. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

PSYC 300    Computer Applications in Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of General Education (G. E.) math requirement and prior completion or concurrent enrollment in Psych 201 and 202. General introduction to the use of computers in psychology. Selection and use of application programs in research, statistics and testing will be emphasized. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

PSYC 302    Learning and Memory

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202. Students taking Psych 302L concurrently must also have completed Psych 300. Overview of theories and research in classical and operant conditioning, verbal learning, concept learning and memory.
Units: (3)

PSYC 302L    Laboratory in Learning and Memory

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202, 300. Pre- or corequisite: Psych 302. Laboratory course to accompany Psych 302. Application of research methods to the study of topics in learning and memory. Empirical research will be designed, conducted, analyzed and interpreted. Written research reports required. (4 hours of laboratory).
Units: (2)

PSYC 303    Sensation and Perception

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202. Students taking Psych 303L concurrently must also have completed Psych 300. Detailed examination of anatomical, physiological and psychological/behavioral aspects of sensation and perception in humans and other animals. Emphasizes all five basic senses: vision, hearing, touch, taste and smell.
Units: (3)

PSYC 303L    Laboratory in Sensation and Perception

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202, 300. Pre- or corequisite: Psych 303. Laboratory course to accompany Psych 303. Application of research methods to topics in sensation and perception. Empirical research will be designed, conducted, analyzed and interpreted in the context of existing theories. Written research reports required. (4 hours of laboratory).
Units: (2)

PSYC 304    Comparative Animal Behavior

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202. Students taking Psych 304L concurrently must also have completed Psych 300. Detailed study of human behavior in comparison with other animal species within an evolutionary context, including behavior genetics, sensory systems, development, communications, parental behavior, mating strategies, aggression, and social organizations. Field trips to local zoos required.
Units: (3)

PSYC 304L    Laboratory in Comparative Animal Behavior

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202, 300. Pre- or corequisite: Psych 304. Laboratory course to accompany Psych 304. Laboratory and field studies in animal behavior. Empirical research will be designed, conducted, analyzed and interpreted. Written research reports required. (4 hours of laboratory).
Units: (2)

PSYC 305    Cognitive Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202. Students taking Psych 305L concurrently must also have completed Psych 300. Overview of current theories and research in cognitive psychology, cognitive neuroscience and cognitive science. Topics include perception and attention, imagery, memory, language, creativity, problem solving, reasoning and decision making.
Units: (3)

PSYC 305L    Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202, 300. Pre- or corequisite, Psych 305. Laboratory course to accompany Psych 305. Application of theoretical and experimental principles and findings in cognitive psychology. Empirical research will be designed, conducted, analyzed, interpreted and presented. Written research reports required. One or more sections offered online. (4 hours of laboratory).
Units: (2)

PSYC 306    Biopsychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101, 201, 202. Students taking Psych 306L concurrently must also have completed Psych 300. Topics in biopsychology, including development of nervous system, neural activity, neurotransmitters, the synapse, sensory and motor systems, biological motives, sleep, brain damage, learning, language centers, neurology of mental illnesses, and drug effects in the brain.
Units: (3)

PSYC 306L    Laboratory in Biopsychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101, 201, 202, 300. Pre- or corequisite: Psych 306. Laboratory course to accompany Psych 306. Empirical research will be designed, conducted, analyzed and interpreted involving areas of biopsychology. Written research reports required. (4 hours of laboratory).
Units: (2)

PSYC 310    Psychology of Women

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101. Survey of theories, research and implications for the psychological study of gender differences and similarities, particularly as pertains to the psychological characteristics and problems of women.
Units: (3)

PSYC 311    Educational Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Application of psychological research and theory to educational processes, including learning, motivation, individual differences, teaching methods and evaluation. Recommended for those interested in teaching careers.
Units: (3)

PSYC 312    The Psychology of Human Sexual Behavior

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Topics in human sexual behavior integrating sexuality as biological, social, clinical and developmental. Surveys and statistics of sexual behavior, sexual orientation, gender identity, sexual variations, causes and treatment of sexual dysfunctions. Legal, moral and social issues.
Units: (3)

PSYC 315    Evaluating Popular Psychology Concepts

Description: Prerequisite: completion of the G. E. Category I.C. Popular psychology viewpoints are evaluated for their logical coherence, openness to scientific test and whether they are supported by evidence. The difference between personal, experiential appeal and scientific validity.
Units: (3)

PSYC 317    Legal Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Survey of issues in psychology and the law with an emphasis on the impact of social scientific evidence on the legal system. Topics include issues surrounding the death penalty, eyewitness testimony, jury decision-making, pretrial publicity and the insanity defense.
Units: (3)

PSYC 322    Psychology of African Americans

Description: (Same as Afro-Ethnic 322)
Units: (3)

PSYC 331    Psychology of Personality

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Broad survey of research, theory and assessment techniques in the area of personality. One or more sections offered online.
Units: (3)

PSYC 341    Abnormal Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Symptoms, causes, treatment and prevention of mental problems; anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psycho-physiological disorders, psychoses, substance use disorders, sexual disorders and organic disorders.
Units: (3)

PSYC 342    Survey of Clinical Psychology (formerly 481)

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 341. Methods, diagnosis, therapeutic techniques, research, educational requirements, professional requirements, ethics, graduate school preparation, choosing graduate programs.
Units: (3)

PSYC 346    Asian American Psychology

Description: (Same as Asian American 346)
Units: (3)

PSYC 350    Environmental Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101 and completion of G. E. Category III.C.1. Theory, research and method in the study of behavior-environment relationships. Influence of such variables as population density and urban design on human behavior.
Units: (3)

PSYC 351    Social Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Social psychology is the study of how people think about, influence and relate to one another. Topics include social perception and cognition, attitudes and attitude change, attraction, altruism, aggression, interpersonal influence and group processes.
Units: (3)

PSYC 361    Developmental Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Theories, methods and research findings regarding physical, cognitive and psychosocial human development, including such topics as perception, learning, intelligence and personality.
Units: (3)

PSYC 362    Psychology of Aging

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Characteristics of humans during the adult years. Topics include physical, intellectual, cognitive, personal, social and psychological development, vocational and family changes, retirement and death.
Units: (3)

PSYC 363    Experimental Child Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101 and two of the following: Psych 361, Child/Adolescent Studies 312, 320, 325 or 330. Research methodology in developmental psychology. Critical examination of empirical studies. Design and execution of an empirical investigation. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory).
Units: (3)

PSYC 391    Industrial/Organizational Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 101. Human behavior in the workplace. Traditional and current psychological principles applied to industrial, organizational and business settings. Selection, placement, training, work motivation, human factors, environmental influences, leadership, work stress, workplace violence, organizational communication, organizational development and consumer behavior.
Units: (3)

PSYC 408    History of Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: one of the following: Psych 302, 303, 304, 305 or 306; and two of the following: Psych 331, 341, 351 and 361. Development of psychology from early times to the present; major traditions and conceptual issues.
Units: (3)

PSYC 414    Cognitive Neuroscience

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 305 and 306, or consent of instructor. Human cognitive behavior as a brain-based activity: Methodology of Cognitive Neuroscience, functional neuroanatomy and their relationships to perception, attentional encoding and control mechanisms, memory, emotion, language and consciousness.
Units: (3)

PSYC 415    Cognitive Processes

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 302, 303 or 305. Advanced treatment of theory and research in such topics as attention, pattern recognition, memory, knowledge representation, language, decision-making, judgment, reasoning and problem solving.
Units: (3)

PSYC 417    Psycholinguistics

Description: Prerequisite: six hours of upper-division work in psychology or linguistics. Theory and research on the psychological processes that make possible language acquisition and use. Three major concerns are: comprehension of spoken and written language; speech production; and language acquisition. (Same as Linguistics 417)
Units: (3)

PSYC 430    A Social Psychological Study in Ethnic Minority Behavior

Description: (Same as Afro-Ethnic 430)
Units: (3)

PSYC 431    Theories of Personality

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 331. Traditional and contemporary theories of personality, including psychoanalytic, humanistic-existential, behavioral, trait and social interaction approaches.
Units: (3)

PSYC 461    Psychological Testing

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 201, 202, 300 and senior status (completion of 90 or more units). Intelligence, aptitude, interest and personality testing. Theory, construction, evaluation, interpretation and uses of psychological tests.
Units: (3)

PSYC 464    Advanced Developmental Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 202, Child/Adolescent Studies 301, 312 or Psychology 361. Review and analysis of major theoretical, empirical and applied issues in developmental psychology.
Units: (3)

PSYC 465    Advanced Psychological Statistics

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 201, 202 and 300. General linear model, regression, analysis of variance techniques and applications to research design and evaluation of data.
Units: (3)

PSYC 466    Advanced Social Science Computer Applications

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 201 and 300 or equivalent. Advanced computer applications focusing on topics such as web page development, data analysis, graphing, data bases and online experimentation and data collection.
Units: (3)

PSYC 467    Multivariate Statistics for Psychology

Description: Prerequisite: Psych 465. Multivariate analysis of variance, profile analysis, discriminate analysis, factor analysis, cluster analysis, multidimensional scaling, introduction to structural equations and hierarchical linear models, and applications to psychological research.
Units: (3)

PSYC 473    Sleep, Dreams, and Behavior

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 306, 331, 341. Role of sleep and dreams in controlling awake behavior. Course topics include historical views/theories, the neurobiology of sleep and dreams, sleep-wake schedules, sleep disorders, and their relationships to cognitive, personality and psychopathology.
Units: (3)

PSYC 474    Health Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 101 and completion of nine units of upper-division psychology courses. Role of psychology in prediction, prevention and treatment of medical disorders, including stress and illness, psycho-neuro-immunology, psychological aspects of chronic illnesses, behavioral medicine, physician-patient dynamics.
Units: (3)

PSYC 475    Psychopharmacology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 306 and 341. Basic principles underlying the therapeutic use of drugs and related substances to modify experience and behavior. Psychological, medical and social potentials/limitations of these pharmacotherapys in treating psychological disorders.
Units: (3)

PSYC 480M    MARC Proseminar

Description: (Same as Biology 480M)
Units: (1)

PSYC 495    Field Placement in Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: nine units of 300-level psychology courses completed at CSUF by the time of course registration, and a 2.0 GPA in psychology courses. The internship is a supervised experience in which psychological principles or methods are applied in a fieldwork setting. There will be mandatory class meetings for students to discuss and write about their experiences of integrating psychological theory with practice. Required of majors.
Units: (3)

PSYC 496    Student-to-Student Tutorials

Description: Consult “Student-to-Student Tutorials” in this catalog for more complete course descriptions. 
Units: (1-3)

PSYC 498    Directed Empirical Research

Description: Prerequisites: completion of one upper-division laboratory course in psychology and consent of instructor. Study plan must be approved by university census date. Individual laboratory investigation under direction of a faculty member. No more than three units of credit toward the major.
Units: (1-3)

PSYC 499    Directed Library Research

Description: Prerequisites: completion of at least one upper-division laboratory course in psychology and consent of instructor. Study plan must be approved by university census date. Individual library study under direction of a faculty member. No more than three units of credit toward the major.
Units: (1-3)

PSYC 500    Issues and Perspectives in Psychological Research

Description: Prerequisites: admission to the psychology graduate program and consent of instructor. Current theoretical, professional and methodological issues in psychology.
Units: (3)

PSYC 501    Professional and Legal Issues

Description: Prerequisite: admission to the M.S. Psychology (clinical) program. Introduction to methodological, ethical and legal issues in the field of Clinical Psychology.
Units: (3)

PSYC 510    Research Design

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 201, 465 and admission to a psychology graduate program. Principles and methods of planning and carrying out systematic psychological research, interdependence of research design and statistical evaluation of results. Practice in formulation of testable hypotheses.
Units: (3)

PSYC 520T    Seminar: Advanced Topics in Psychological Research

Description: Prerequisite: admission to a psychology graduate program. Content of seminar may vary each semester. A topic is selected for in-depth study from one or more specialty areas within the field of psychology. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (3)

PSYC 543    Advanced Lifespan Development

Description: Prerequisite: admission to the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. In-depth study of advanced lifespan development, theory and research.
Units: (3)

PSYC 545    Advanced Psychopathology

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 341 or equivalent and admission to either the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program or the M.A. Psychology program. In-depth study of diagnosis, etiology theories, research and prevention of adult and child psychopathology.
Units: (3)

PSYC 547    Theories of Psychological Intervention

Description: Prerequisite: admission to M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. In-depth coverage of psychotherapy. Principle theoretical approaches covered are: psychodynamic, humanistic, and behavioral/cognitive behavioral.
Units: (3)

PSYC 548    Psychotherapy Techniques

Description: Prerequisite: admission to the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. A skills course in conducting diagnostic interviews and basic therapeutic techniques. Role playing and video feedback will play a central role in course. (2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory)
Units: (3)

PSYC 549    Marriage, Family and Child Therapy

Description: Prerequisite: completion of first year in M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. Marriage, family and child therapy: theory, techniques and research.
Units: (3)

PSYC 560    Child and Adolescent Treatment

Description: Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of the first semester of the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. Specific therapy techniques, including behavioral, and general approaches to the treatment of children and adolescents.
Units: (3)

PSYC 561    Clinical Psychology Assessment

Description: Prerequisites: Psych 461 and admission to the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. Theory, administration, scoring and interpretation of measures of intelligence and objective personality inventories.
Units: (3)

PSYC 568    Substance Abuse

Description: Prerequisite: admission to the graduate program. Impact of alcoholism and drug abuse on the individual, family and community; clinical skills in the diagnosis and treatment of substance abuse; and research on diagnosis and outcome.
Units: (1)

PSYC 569    Cross-Cultural Psychology

Description: Prerequisites: completion of Psych 545 and 547. In-depth study of cross-cultural issues as they apply to clinical psychology, specifically psychotherapy. Practical, research and theoretical issues.
Units: (3)

PSYC 594A    Fieldwork

Description: Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of first year’s work in the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. Supervised clinical work in mental health agencies. (Minimum of 12 hours field experience per week.)
Units: (3)

PSYC 594B    Fieldwork

Description: Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of first year’s work in the M.S. Psychology (Clinical) program. Supervised clinical work in mental health agencies. (Minimum of 12 hours field experience per week.)
Units: (3)

PSYC 598    Thesis Research

Description: Prerequisites: formal advancement to candidacy and consent of instructor. Development of a proposal for a major piece of empirical research, execution of the study, analysis of the results and writing of a thesis.
Units: (3 or 6)

PSYC 599    Independent Graduate Research

Description: Prerequisites: admission to a psychology graduate program and consent of instructor. Empirical research in a selected area of psychology. Designed, conducted and written by the student with the collaboration of a member of the faculty. May be repeated for credit.
Units: (1-3)




Back to Top