Past MARC Scholars

Graduating Class of 2018:

 

Jessica Barragan will enter the UCI Post-Baccalaureate Program in Psychology and Social Behavior in the fall of 2018. While in the MARC Program, Jessica worked in the laboratory of Dr. Iris Blandón-Gitlin in the Department of Psychology investigating how face recognition of previously-seen disguised faces is affected by identification procedures.

 

Alexis Drain will enter the Social Psychology PhD Program at the University of Delaware in the fall of 2018 with a Graduate Scholar’s Award for the 2018-2019 academic year. While in the MARC Program, Alexis worked with Dr. Jessie Peissig in the Department of Psychology studying the impact of eyebrows on facial recognition of unfamiliar faces.

 

Collin Marshall will begin his doctorate work within the Biomedical Sciences Program at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2018. While in the MARC and HHMI Programs, Collin worked in the laboratory of Dr. Niroshika Keppetipola, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. He investigated how differences in post-translational modifications, which occur in Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein 1 and 2, influence partner protein interactions, and in turn splicing repression activity demonstrated by the two paralogous proteins.

 

Julia Ngo will start her PhD research within the Department of Biology Graduate Program at the University of Oregon (UO) in the fall of 2018. UO is where Julia participated in a summer research program in 2017. While in the MARC program, Julia worked in the laboratory of Dr. Hope Johnson in the Department of Biological Science investigating how bacterial manganese (Mn) oxidizing proteins can oxidize Mn(II) to Mn(III)/Mn(IV), forming strong oxidants that can potentially be used for bioremediation.

 

Trini Nguyen will enter the Graduate Program (PhD) in Mathematical, Computational and Systems Biology at the University of California, Irvine in the fall of 2018. While in the MARC Program, Trini worked in the laboratory of Dr. Charles Lee in the Department of Mathematics developing a mathematical model that will help to detect dry-eye diseases. She developed and implemented computer codes that validated the model with actual laboratory data, which was gathered after rapidly bouncing light into the eye at different wavelengths and measuring the reflectance.

 

Janice Reynaga  started her PhD journey in the summer of 2018 within the Graduate Group in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at the University of Pennsylvania; she is currently completing her first lab rotation. While in the MARC program, Janice  worked in the laboratory of Dr. Niroshika Keppetipola in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry to determine whether post-translational modifications affected the different splicing activities of the paralogous RNA binding proteins, Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein 1 and 2.

 

Isabel Serrano will enter the Computational Biology PhD Program at the University of California, Berkeley in the fall of 2018. While in the MARC Program, Isabel worked in the laboratory of Dr. Anael Verdugo in the Department of Mathematics analyzing and modeling evolutionary processes of macro elements through differential equations. Ideally, the algorithms that were identified may be used to describe the long-term behavior of such processes, and be generalized to explain the evolution of micro populations.

 

Graduating Class of 2017:

 

Criselda Dillague entered the Biomedical Sciences PhD program at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the fall of 2017. She is completing her final lab rotation, before selecting the lab that she will work in toward her PhD. Criselda’s MARC thesis was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Esther Chen, Department of Biological Science. There Criselda investigated genes that were controlled by the ExoS/ChvI two-component signaling pathway of the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti. She constructed S. meliloti  mutants and examined their phenotypes to investigate gene function.

 

Mansour Dughbaj began his doctoral appointment in Pharmaceutical and Translational Sciences at the University of Southern California in the fall of 2017. During his two-year appointment in the MARC Program, Mansour worked in the laboratory of Dr. Melanie Sacco in the Department of Biological Science. He investigated potential protein interactions with the Polerovirus P0 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana and Nicotiana glutinosa using a yeast two-hybrid system.

 

Amanda Iglesias entered the Neuroscience PhD Program at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2017. Amanda is completing her third lab rotation and will soon decide which lab she will work in toward her PhD. While in the MARC Program, Amanda worked with Dr. Jennifer Trevitt in the Department of Psychology investigating how high-fat diets, high-sucrose diets, and physical activity impacted decision making and anxiety in an animal model.

 

N. Carolina Mendoza entered the Microbiology Doctoral Training Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the fall 2017. Carolina reports that she is working to develop her PhD research project with her primary PI, Dr. Laura Knoll. She is looking to characterize interactions between non-pathogenic protozoans and defined bacterial communities within the human gut, possibly incorporating bioinformatic approaches like genome sequencing and metagenomics. Her MARC thesis research was competed in the laboratory of Dr. Esther Chen in the Department of Biological Science. There Carolina studied how the ExoS/ChvI signaling pathway controls gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti, a nitrogen-fixing bacterium able to develop a symbiotic relationship with certain legumes.

 

Maedeh Mousavi is participating in the UCI Post-Baccalaureate Program in Psychology and Social Behavior, which she entered in the fall of 2017. She is currently working with Dr. Elizabeth Loftus on a number of memory-related topics, including how memory impacts the legal system. While in the MARC Program, Maedeh worked in the laboratory of Dr. Jessie Peissig in the Department of Psychology on the effects of eyelash fullness and length on the perception of facial attractiveness mediated by hormone levels.

 

Robert Jordan Ontiveros began his doctoral work in Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at the University of Pennsylvania during the fall of 2017. Jordan has not yet decided on his thesis lab. While in the MARC Program, Jordan worked to identify and characterize the minimal functional form of the splicing regulator, Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein 1, in the laboratory of Dr. Niroshika Keppetipola, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry.

 

Deshawn Sambrano entered a PhD program in Cognition and Perception at New York University in the fall of 2017. He is a member of Dr. Elizabeth Phelps’s laboratory, and is applying an interdisciplinary approach to evaluating how emotion and cognition affect decision making. During his tenure in the MARC Program, Deshawn studied the interactions between emotion and cognition in the laboratory of Dr. Iris Blandón-Gitlin in the Department of Psychology. More specifically, he looked at the effects of angry, sad, happy, and neutral moods on information processing style, judgments, and decision making.

 

Graduating Class of 2016:

Nicholas Armada entered a PhD program in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in the fall of 2016. He is working on his thesis research in the laboratory of Dr. Jian Zhang, where new nanoporous materials are synthesized and characterized using synthetic and physical techniques. While in the MARC Program, Nicolas’ MARC thesis research was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Peter de Lijser in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry on intramolecular reactions of oxime and oxime ether radical cations with alkenes as nucleophiles.

 

Alyssa Bormann began her doctoral appointment in Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley in the fall of 2016. She works is the laboratory of Dr. Craig Miller investigating  pattern formation during development. During her two-year appointment in the MARC Program, Alyssa worked in the laboratory of Dr. Math Cuajungco in the Department of Biological Science. She created TRPML1 and TMEM163 knockout cell lines using CRISPR-Cas9 technology in order to study these proteins in relation to the cellular pathology observed in Mucolipidosis type IV disease.

Jacqueline Castro entered a PhD program in Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas in the fall of 2016 and chose to do her dissertation in the laboratory of Dr. Alice O'Toole in the Department of Psychology. While in the MARC Program, Jackie worked in the laboratory of Dr. Jessie Peissig in the Department of Psychology investigating how the race of the perceiver and those being perceived impacts the recognition of disguised faces.

Aneta Jelowicki began her doctoral appointment in the Chemistry & Biochemistry Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara in the fall of 2016. Her MARC thesis research was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Peter de Lijser in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry in collaboration with Dr. Nilay Patel in the Department of Biological Science. Aneta synthesized small organic molecules that were used in biochemical and biological assays to determine how the structure of the molecules affected cancer cell lines.

Miranda Petty entered a PhD program in Cognition and Perception at the University of Washington in the fall of 2016. Miranda is working with Dr. John Palmer and Dr. Geoffrey Boynton in the Vision and Cognition Group on two projects. The first focuses on selective attention and uses a paradigm called "partially-valid cueing," while the second focuses on the neural basis of divided attention and uses the multiple-object tracking paradigm. During her tenure in the MARC Program, Miranda worked with Dr. Iris Blandon-Gitlin in the Department of Psychology on the influence of moods and discrete emotions on the cognitive processes involved in evaluating deceptive messages

 

Bianca Ruiz began her doctoral work in Genome Sciences at the University of Washington in the fall of 2016. Bianca works in the laboratory of Dr. Stan Fields studying the effects and mechanisms of mistranslation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.  While in the MARC Program, Bianca worked with Dr. Hope Johnson in the Department of Biological Science. She investigated the role of microbial Mn oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1 through competition experiments, using a microbe with a bacteriolytic secretion system.

 

Graduating Class of 2016:

Michael Ko entered the Department of Chemistry PhD Program at Dartmouth College in the fall of 2015. He is completing his doctoral research in the laboratory of Dr. Katherine Mirica. There Michael studies the design and synthesis of conductive, responsive materials that will enable home-based, patient-centered electron wireless monitoring of small molecule biomarkers for chronic diseases. His MARC thesis research was competed in the laboratory of Dr. Peter de Lijser in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry on mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates derived from o-alkenylaryl oximes and oxime ethers under photochemical conditions.

Sean Page is currently a research assistant in the Department of Molecular Immunology at the City of Hope. While in the MARC Program, Sean worked in the laboratory of Dr. Jennifer Trevitt in the Department of Psychology examining the benefits of vitamin D and physical exercise on cognitive and immunologic factors in an animal model of depression.

 

Carissa Romero began her doctoral appointment in the Cognitive and Brain Sciences Program in the Department of Psychology at the University Nevada, Reno in the fall of 2015. She chose to do her dissertation in the laboratory of Dr. Jacqueline Snow in the Department of Psychology,  studying object perception and decision making; specifically the analysis of the valuation of consumer goods based on caloric content and the presence of real life exemplars versus images. During her two-year appointment in the MARC Program, Carissa worked in the laboratory of Dr. Eriko Self in the Department of Psychology examining visual search performance in relation to competitiveness.

Joshua Silva entered the Pharmaceutical and Translational Sciences PhD Program at the University of Southern California in the fall of 2017. After graduating from Cal State Fullerton, Joshua entered the NSF Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Bridge to the Doctorate (LSAMP-BD) Program at California State University, Los Angeles in September of 2015. There he worked on his Master’s thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Nathan Lanning in the Department of Molecular and Developmental Biology. As a MARC scholar, Joshua worked in the laboratory of Dr. Math Cuajungco in the Department of Biological Science analyzing how point mutations in the Transient Receptor Potential Mucolipin-1 protein affected its ability to bind with a membrane protein interaction partner.

 

Jennifer Spencer entered a PhD program in the Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology within the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in August of 2015. She chose to do her dissertation under the co-mentorship of Dr. Rebecca Rico-Hesse and Dr. Jason Kimata. Jennifer is studying the sexual transmission of Zika virus, including  urogenital tract tropisms , viral pathogenesis mechanisms, and entry receptors. During her tenure in the MARC Program, Jennifer worked in the laboratory of Dr. Melanie Sacco in the Department of Biological Science investigating the defense responses of Nicotiana benthamiana to the 14-3-3 gene family using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS).

Rebecca Vargas recently entered the Cellular and Molecular Bioscience Program at the University of California, Irvine, beginning her first lab rotation in the summer of 2018. After completing the NSF Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Bridge to the Doctorate (LSAMP-BD) Program at California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA) in 2017, Rebecca worked for Fisher Scientific. While at CSULA, she completed her Master’s research in the laboratory of Dr. Xin Wen (Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry) on the influence of antifreeze proteins from cold-adapted beetles on the thermal inhibition of enzymes. Rebecca’s MARC thesis research  was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Maria Linder in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry on the identification and characterization of an additional copper uptake transporter in the membrane of cells that do not possess a copper transporter.

 

Graduating Class of 2014:

 

Katherina Chua entered a PhD program in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics at the University of California, San Francisco in the fall of 2014. After finishing several rotations, she chose to complete her dissertation in the laboratory of Dr. Deanna Kroetz in the Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences. There Kat is studying the genetic variation in an F-actin binding protein during neuronal development and response to injury. While in the MARC Program, Kat worked with Dr. Michael Bridges in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry on structural studies of stathmin oligomerization and measurements of interspin distances using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy.

Leonila Lagunes is currently a fifth-year doctoral candidate in the Department of Mathematical and Computational Biology at the University of California, Irvine. She conducts research in the laboratories of Dr. German Enciso (Math) and Dr. Lee Bardwell (Developmental and Cellular Biology). Leo is using a combination of mathematical modeling and experimental analysis to better understand the interaction of MAP kinase with Gli1 and the function and mechanisms associated with multi-site phosphorylation. For her MARC research, Leo worked with Dr. Charles Lee in the Department of Mathematics on the use of biomimetic algorithms in detecting different types of cancers using DNA microarray data.

Jaime Muñoz entered a PhD program in Psychology at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2014. For his doctoral thesis, Jaime is working in the Translational and Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory of Dr. Chris Monk where he investigates adolescent brain development in the context of poverty.  During his tenure in the MARC Program, Jaime worked with Dr. Nancy Segal in the Department of Psychology on a twin study that qualitatively judged the presence of creativity traits expressed by reared-apart fraternal and identical twins.

Eric Yik remained at Cal State Fullerton, working toward his Master’s in Biochemistry in the laboratory of Dr. Christopher Meyer in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. Eric defended his thesis in the spring of 2017 and entered a PhD program in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, Irvine in the fall of 2017. Eric works in the laboratory of Dr. John Chaput where he is studying protein engineering. As a MARC scholar Eric worked with Dr. Meyer on structure-function studies of the diverse ADPGlucose Pyrophosphorylase from Thermodesufovibrio yellowstonii.

Aspen Yoo is fifth-year doctoral candidate in the Cognition and Perception PhD Program at New York University. She works in the laboratory of Dr. Wei Ji Ma in the Center for Neural Science within the Department of Psychology on how top-down cognitive processes affect visual perception and memory. While a MARC scholar, Aspen worked with Dr. Iris Blandón-Gitlin in the Department of Psychology to test a short cognitive load interview approach on detect deception.

 

Graduating Class of 2013:

Christina Adams entered the Biomedical Sciences Graduate Program at the University of California, San Francisco in the fall of 2013. For her doctoral thesis, Christina works in the laboratory of Dr. Rushika Perera in the Department of Pathology on the trafficking and regulation of oncogenic signaling in pancreatic cancer. During her tenure in the MARC Program, Christina worked on developing C. elegans as a model system for studying the action of antisense oligonucleotides on antibiotic resistance gene expression in pathogenic bacteria in the laboratories of Dr. Chandra Srinivasan in the Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry and Dr. Marcelo Tolmasky in the Department of Biological Science.

Jorly Chatouphonexay began her graduate (PhD) appointment in September 2013 in the Applied Mathematics Program at Arizona State University (ASU) and worked with Dr. Eric Kostelich in the School of Math & Statistical Sciences, applying an algorithm called the Kalman Filter (KF) to predict a patient’s prostate specific antigen (PSA) level. Jorly  received her Master’s from ASU in 2017 and is now working as a Information Security Analyst at Charles Schwab. While in the MARC Program, Jorly studied the maximum likelihood estimation of the fat fraction in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in the laboratory of Dr. Angel Pineda in the Department of Mathematics.

Reinalyn Echon is participating in the Psychology PhD Program at Idaho State University. She is working in the laboratory of Dr. Kandi Turley-Ame  investigating whether the ability to lie is related to working memory span (i.e., the cognitive ability to both process and maintain relevant information to solve the problem/task at hand). Reinalyn uses an eye tracker to determine whether working memory span relates to different magnitudes of eye movement when lying or telling the truth. For her MARC research, Reinalyn examined the effect of cognitive load on improving deception detection in the laboratory of Dr. Iris Blandón-Gitlin, Department of Psychology.

Jessica Morgan entered the Biomedical Sciences and Engineering Program at the University of California, Santa Cruz in the fall of 2013, completing her PhD dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Victoria Auerbuch Stone in the Department of Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology. Jessica defended her thesis in August of 2018 and accepted a research position at Claret Bioscience, a new biotech company that develops “tools and assays for better characterizing the biology of cancer-derived molecules.”  While in the Stone Auerbuch lab, Jessica worked on developing high throughput screening techniques that can be used to identify type-three secretion system inhibitors. As a MARC scholar, she investigated the participation of the membrane proteins, DMT1 and Zip8, in the release of ferrous iron from the lysosome in the laboratory of Dr. Maria Linder, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry.

Brayan Ortiz entered the University of Washington in the Department of Biostatistics in the fall of 2013, investigating with Dr. Noah Simon the properties of high-dimensional inference methods in small to large sample sizes. He specifically compared “state-of-the-art methodology and classical methods for sparse problems.” In July of 2018, Brayan earned his doctorate and accepted a research scientist position with Amazon in their Modeling and Optimization group. He will also hold an appointment as an Adjunct Professor of Biostatistics at the Sonora Cancer Research Center. For his MARC thesis project, which was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Mori Jamshidian in the Department of Mathematics, Brayan evaluated the statistical modeling and application to the cognitive aspects of Multiple Sclerosis.

 

Graduating Class of 2012:

Macarena Aloi participated in a one-year post-baccalaureate research program at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill during the 2012-2013 academic year. In the fall of 2013 she entered the Pathology and Molecular Basis of Disease Graduate Program at the University of Washington to pursue a PhD. After several rotations, she chose to complete her dissertation research in the laboratory of Dr. Gwenn Garden in the Department of Neurology. There Macarena  studies the role of micro-RNAs in the microglia-mediated immune response to central nervous system injury and neurodegenerative disease. While a MARC scholar, Macarena worked on identifying a putative phytochrome-like photoreceptor which regulates the expression of red light-induced psbA RNA binding protein genes in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the laboratory of Dr. Amybeth Cohen, Department of Biological Science.

Eric Starr earned his doctorate in 2017 at the University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences in Medical Science under the guidance of Dr. Joseph F. Margiotta. While there, Eric worked on understanding which factors are associated with changes in synaptic plasticity within the autonomic nervous system. In November of 2017, Eric began a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Institute of Health in the lab of Dr. Andres Buonanno. As a MARC scholar, Eric completed his thesis research on the effect of unilateral 6-OHDA lesions of the pars compacta (SNc) and adenosine on effort-based decision making in the laboratory of Dr. Jennifer Trevitt, Department of Psychology.

Erin Steelman chose not to enter a PhD program after receiving her B.A. in Psychology at Cal State Fullerton. Instead, she pursued a Master’s in Psychology for MFT (Marriage and Family Therapy) at Chapman University. She worked as a paraeducator in the Torrance Unified School District before deciding become a Realtor. While in the MARC Program, Erin worked in the laboratory of Dr. Iris Blandón-Gitlin, Department of Psychology, evaluating the role that the hormone Oxytocin plays in face recognition.

 

Graduating Class of 2011:

Adrienne Dougherty (Conant) entered a PhD program in Social Psychology at the University of Michigan in the fall of 2011. Her thesis research was conducted under the guidance of Dr. Denise Sekaquaptewa. Adrienne received her PhD in June of 2016, which focused on “how emotions, and the way that we regulate them, influence the effects of stereotype threat, mostly in terms of academic motivation.” Adrienne was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Whittier College in California from 2016-2017 and is currently an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Texas State University. During her tenure in the MARC Program, Adrienne examined how the adenosine antagonist caffeine hinders effort-based decision making in a rodent model in the laboratory of Dr. Jennifer Trevitt, Department of Psychology.

 

Ashley Watson entered the Family and Human Development PhD Program at Arizona State University (ASU) in the fall of 2011. After one year, she took a leave of absence. Ashley permanently left ASU in the fall of 2013 and entered the International College of Christian Ministries to work toward a Bachelor's in Ministry. While in the MARC Program, Ashley investigated the misbinding of visual feature sizes using psychophysical methods; specifically, color, shape, and motion, in the laboratory of Dr. Eriko Self, Department of Psychology.

Joshua Pando remained at Cal State Fullerton after graduating with his B.A. in Psychology, working toward his Master’s in the Psychology Department. He left the program to explore other career goals. While completing his MARC thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Jennifer Trevitt, Department of Psychology, Joshua addressed how caffeine attenuates tacrine-induced c-Fos expression in the dorsal and ventrolateral striatum of the rat brain.

 

Graduating Class of 2010:

Amanda Cook-Sneathen completed her doctorate in Organic Chemistry at the University of Michigan in 2015. She worked in the laboratory of Dr. Melanie Sanford investigating arene/methane functionalization. Amanda held a postdoctoral appointment at Applied Biosciences ETH in Zürich, Switzerland from 2015-2018. In the fall of 2018, she accepted an Assistant Professorship at the University of Oregon in Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. While in the MARC Program, Amanda investigated “Asymmetric Aziridination of Alkenes using N-Heterocyclic Carbenes” in the laboratory of Dr. Christopher Hyland, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry.

 

Harold Pimentel entered a PhD program in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley in the fall of 2010. He worked in the laboratory of Dr. Lior Pachter developing RNA-Seq analysis methods. Harold defended his thesis in May of 2016 and accepted a postdoctoral appointment in the laboratory of Jonathan Pritchard at Stanford University. There Harold is working to develop computational and statistical methods for understanding human genomic data. During his tenure in the MARC Program, Harold evaluated “high-performance computing methods for speedup of crystallographic applications” in the laboratory of Dr. Spiros H. Courellis, Department of Computer Science.

Diana Rigueur entered the UCLA ACCESS Graduate Program in Molecular, Cellular and Integrative Life Sciences in September of 2010, and defended her doctoral thesis in May of 2016. At UCLA, Diana worked in the laboratory of Dr. Julian Martinez-Agosto on the TOR and Hippo signaling pathways in Drosophila melanogaster brain development. She accepted a postdoctoral appointment at the University of Southern California, and now conducts research in the laboratory of Dr. Amy E. Merrill, Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology. For her MARC project, Diana studied “MAGP-2 expression on ovarian carcinoma cell lines” in the laboratory of Dr. Alison Miyamoto, Department of Biological Science.

Rolando Ruiz participated in a Post Baccalaureate Research Education Program at Tufts University during 2010-2011. He entered the Cellular and Molecular Biosciences PhD Program at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) in the fall of 2011, working in the laboratory of Anand Ganesan, MD, PhD. Rolando received his doctorate in May 2017 and has remained at UCI for his postdoctoral appointment in Computational Biology. While at Cal State Fullerton, Rolando conducted his MARC thesis research on the “Localization of protein kinase C in Ascidia ceratodes sperm cells” in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Koch, Department of Biological Science.

 

Graduating Class of 2009:

Gary Gallego received his PhD in Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in December of 2013. He is currently a Senior Scientist in Oncology at Pfizer in San Diego, CA. While in the MARC Program, Gary worked to further understand "Cyclopropenes: highly strained building blocks for organic synthesis" in the laboratory of Dr. Christopher Hyland, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry.

Vanessa Harris received her PhD from the Department of Cognitive Development at the University of Miami, Ohio in the spring of 2014. Her doctoral thesis examined the parenting challenges experienced by previously incarcerated mothers. Vanessa is a tenure-track Assistant Professor at Indiana University- Kokomo. While in the MARC Program, Vanessa examined the effects of losing a twin: the bereavement-related behaviors of identical and fraternal twins, as well as the consequences of losing a twin versus a non-twin. Her MARC research was carried out in the laboratory of Dr. Nancy Segal, Department of Psychology.

 

Graduating Class of 2008:

Jose Corleto entered the PhD program in Biomedical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego in 2009. He received his PhD in 2015 for research completed in the Neuroregeneration Laboratory of Dr. Martin Marsala, where translational, cell-based approaches are used to study Huntington’s disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in rat and mouse models. Jose is currently a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Southern California. While in the MARC Program, Jose completed his thesis research in the laboratory of Dr. Robert Koch, Department of Biological Science, on “the role of RhoGTPases and their effector proteins on myosin II activation in the sperm of Ascidia ceratodes.”

Jacob Gonzalez received his PhD from the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program at Yale University in 2014. He recently completed a postdoctoral research position in the laboratory of David Cheresh at the University of California, San Diego and now works as a ‎STEM Career Advisor at Wesleyan University in Middletown, CT. While in the MARC Program, Jacob worked on the structure and function relationships of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Thermus thermophilus in the laboratory of Dr. Christopher Meyer, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry.

 

Graduating Class of 2007:

Kevin Chavarria is currently a Senior Producer at EA Digital Illusions Creative Entertainment in Los Angeles, CA. His MARC research evaluated the social relationships in twins and their families in the laboratory of Dr. Nancy Segal, Department of Psychology.

Anita Nosratieh received her PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of California, Davis in February 2014. She worked in the laboratory of Dr. John Boone, in the Department of Radiology, designing instruments for improved breast cancer screening. Anita is currently the Senior Advisor for Innovation in the Center of Devices and Radiological Health at the FDA. While a MARC scholar, Anita worked on the development and characterization of novel substrates for the Bcr-Abl kinase in the laboratory of Dr. Nancy Albritton, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Irvine.

Eric Nunes obtained his PhD in 2012 from the Behavioral Neuroscience Program at the University of Connecticut. For his doctoral thesis, Eric investigated effort-related impairments, including the psychomotor slowing and fatigue that is seen in depression in the laboratory of Dr. John Salamone. Eric is  a postdoctoral research associate in the laboratory of Dr. Nii Antie Addy in the Psychiatry Department at Yale University. During his MARC tenure, Eric investigated the relationship between adenosine and dopamine in the brain and its relation to Parkinson's disease in the laboratory of Dr. Jennifer Trevitt, Department of Psychology.

 

T. Richard Parenteau entered the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the University of California, San Francisco in 2009, working toward his MD/PhD. He received his MD and is working toward completing his PhD. Before entering the MSTP program, Richard completed an MD/PhD PREP program at the Mayo Clinic. While in the MARC Program, Richard worked in the laboratory of Dr. Marcelo Tolmasky, Department of Biological Science, using real time PCR to determine the half-life of the antibiotic resistance AAC(6')-lb mRNA.


 

Graduating Class of 2006:

Diego Miranda received his PhD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in December of 2011. He completed his first postdoctoral appointment in the laboratory of Dr. David Silver at Duke University's international campus in Singapore, and his second postdoctoral appointment in the laboratory of Dr. Holly Ingraham at the University of California, San Francisco. In 2018, Diego accepted a Research Scientist position at Gilead Sciences in San Francisco, CA. While in the MARC Program, Diego worked on the identification of peptide inhibitors of aminoglycoside modifying enzyme 6’-N-acetyl transferase type lb in the laboratory of Dr. Marcelo Tolmasky, Department of Biological Science.

 

Paul Gerard completed the UC Irvine PREP Program before moving into the laboratory of Dr. Larry Marsh for his PhD. He is currently a molecular biologist - manager at a biotech company in Orange County, CA. As a MARC scholar, Paul investigated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a viable bioreactor for formation of three single-chain variable antibody fragments against botulinum neurotoxin in the laboratory of Dr. Amybeth Cohen, Department of Biological Science.

 

Graduating Class of 2005:

Richard Ancheta received his MD from UCLA Medical School in 2010. After competing an internship and residency at Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, CA, he joined Overlake Medical Center in Seattle, WA where he specializes in hematology/oncology. While in the MARC Program, Richard conducted loss of function studies of the zig-6 gene in C. elegans in the laboratory of Dr. Oscar Aurelio, Department of Biological Science.

Ronald Coleman received his PhD from The Scripps Research Institute (TSIR) in May of 2014. He has remained in the laboratory of Dr. Jeanne Loring at the TSIR as a postdoctoral research associate. In January of 2018, Ron moved to Lifeline Cell Technology, assuming a Senior Research Scientist position. His MARC research focused on the design, construction, and assembly of a single chain antibody variable region cocktail against botulinum neurotoxin for expression in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in the laboratory of Dr. Amybeth Cohen, Department of Biological Science.

Lawrence Gray received his PhD from Johns Hopkins in June of 2013 under the direction of Dr. Svetlana Lutsenko. He currently works at the National institute of Health in the National Center for Biotechnology Information. His MARC research was conducted in laboratory of Dr. Maria Linder, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry, and focused on ceruloplasmin and non-ceruloplasmin ferroxidases in mouse and rat sera.