Barrios-Southgate, Genevieve

Director of Community Programs at the Bowers Museum


Multimedia

5535.1_T01_online.mp3

Transcript

Metadata

Field Value
ID 120
Title An oral history with Genevieve Barrios-Southgate
Date 2015-06-02
WPA ID WPA_130
OH ID OH 5535.1
Citation Genevieve Barrios-Southgate interviewed by Jael Muller, June 2, 2015, Santa Ana, California, Oral History # 5535.1, transcript, Women Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage, Center for Oral and Public History, California State University, Fullerton.
Restricted false
Created At 2018-10-31 21:26:50 UTC
Location Santa Ana, California
Language English
Subjects Family → Childhood Experiences
Locations → Santa Ana, California
Family → Parents
Family → Family Histories and Traditions
Family → Role Models
Family → Affects of Political Involvement on Family
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation → in Neighborhoods
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation → at School
Historic Periods → 1950s
Race Relations
Latino/a → Mexican/Mexican American History
Race Relations → Brown-White Race Relations
Organizations → League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)

Abstract

An oral history with Genevieve Barrios-Southgate, current Director of Community Programs at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California. This interview was conducted for the Women, Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview is to shed light on the role of Latinas as activists or political leaders in Orange County. This is part one of a two part interview. Interview covers Barrios-Southgate’s early life in Anaheim, California, and family history; talks about her family’s local grocery store; mentions early role models; discusses how she attended a Mexican school; expounds on the role of her father, Cruz Barrios, an active member of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) particularly during the Mendez vs. Westminster case; provides memories of LULAC; recalls racial discrimination she faced in high school, and within her neighborhood; how the term Chicana/o has changed; discusses moving out of state to pursue a job opportunity with U.S. Senator George Murphy in Washington D.C. and the impact that would have on her life and career; closes the interview with the reactions she faced from her community when she left for Washington, D.C.

Images

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Content Type image/jpeg
Size 50580
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Multimedia

5535.2_T01_online.mp3

Transcript

Abstract

An oral history with Genevieve Barrios-Southgate, current Director of Community Programs at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California. This interview was conducted for the Women, Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage Oral History Project by California State University, Fullerton. The purpose of this interview is to shed light on the role of Latinas as activists or political leaders in Orange County. This is part two of a two-part interview. In this interview, Barrios-Southgate discusses how she started as a community leader through her work in education; how she promotes Mexican culture through Relámpago del Cielo, a folklorical dance group; shares her experiences attending Santa Ana College and transferring to California State University, Fullerton, where she earned her Bachelor’s of Arts in Chicano Studies; recollects her involvement in Mexican American Women’s National Association [MANA] and becoming the organization’s president; discusses her work with Hermanitas, a program MANA offers; talks about relocating to Washington D.C. and the impact the move had on her life; shares how she met her husband; recalls moving back to California and family dynamics; reflects on the political climate in Orange County and Washington D.C.; shares how prejudice motivates her to strive higher; discusses her work at the Bowers Museum, her role as Director of Community Programs and her intent to reach out to the Latino community; speaks about her work with the Kidseum; emphasizes the importance of volunteers; shares how and why she started the Latino Arts Council at the Bowers; shares details on the cultural festivals she plans; remembers her decision to become Democrat; reflects on women in her community and the opportunities they have; shares how she balances home and work life; talks about the different ways men and women are treated; provides her thoughts on feminism; mentions issues she would like to explore further; closes the interview with how she is most proud of her mentorship, and gives advice to a young person wanting to get involved in her line of work.