Fields, Pamela

Black Lives Matter Long Beach Chapter/ Young Survivors Legacy Network


Multimedia

5918_T01_online.mp3

Transcript

Abstract

An oral history of Pamela Fields, a former nurse now activist against police brutality after the tragic shooting of her son, Donte Jordan, by Long Beach Police. The purpose of this interview is to gather information concerning her involvement in several activist groups, demonstrations, and rallies and how she is trying to draw attention to not only her son, but to the countless other victims of police brutality as well. The interview is a part of Natalie Fousekis’ History 401A Oral History Course and the Women, Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage Orla History Project. Specifically, this interview covers Field’s difficult childhood and brief family history; her close-knit family relationships, talks about son, Donte; goes into detail of the day Donte was shot, the immediate aftermath, and the affects his murder had on her immediate family; explains how she became involved with anti-police brutality activism; discusses the several organizations and rallies she has been a part of, which include Black Lives Matter (Long Beach Chapter) and the Young Survivors Legacy Network; specifics of her involvement and being on the frontlines of her activism; what she believes police should do in terms of community policing and building citizen trust; thoughts on police brutality and what causes corruption; talks about her greatest challenges as an activist and being heard; thoughts on being a mother and activist; shares views on being an African American woman in society and the racism she faces; her definition of political courage; voices her support for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 Presidential Election, as well as her concerns and disposition towards Donald Trump; and finally, reasserts concerns of police corruption and how she will not stop advocating for justice.

Images

Field Value
File Name 5918_P01.jpg
Content Type image/jpeg
Size 57079
Description> Pamela Fields at a rally/demonstration in Southern California c. 2015