Salas, Angelica

Executive Director of the Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)


Multimedia

5486.1_T01_online.mp3

Transcript

Metadata

Field Value
ID 150
Title An oral history with Angelica Salas
Date 2014-11-14
WPA ID WPA_164
OH ID OH 5486.1
Citation Angelica Salas interviewed by Jael Muller, November 14, 2014, Los Angeles, California, Oral History # 5486.1, transcript, Women Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage, Center for Oral and Public History, California State University, Fullerton.
Restricted false
Created At 2019-01-14 21:37:08 UTC
Location Los Angeles, California
Language English
Subjects Family → Childhood Experiences
Family → Parents
Historic Periods → 1970s
Citizenship → Immigration
Citizenship → Immigration → Deportation
Citizenship → Immigration → Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
Community Organizations → Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
Historic Periods → 1980s
Citizenship → Immigration Reform
Education → Higher Education
Community Organizations → Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
Chicano/a Movement
Chicano/a Movement → Chicano Identity
Family → Marriage
Family → Children
Family → Parents → activist parents
Family → Childhood Experiences → children of immigrants or refugees
Elections → Propositions → Proposition 187
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation → at School
People → Wilson, Pete
Elected Officials → Presidential → President Barack Obama
Chicano/a Movement → Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán (MEChA)
Latino/a → Organizations → Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlán (MEChA)
Citizenship → Immigration → Dream Act/Dreamers
Work → Discrimination at Work → Undocumented
Locations → Mexico
Colleges → Occidental College

Abstract

An oral history with Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles [CHIRLA]. The interview was conducted for the Women, Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage Oral History Project for California State University, Fullerton’s Center for Oral and Public History. The purpose of this interview was to gather information regarding Salas’ life history and political activism within the immigration reform movement. Specifically, this interview details her family background and history in Durango, Mexico, and immigration to America in the early 1970s; her childhood experiences crossing the United States-Mexico border; discusses the hardships and difficult realities that contemporary immigrant children face; her parents’ work history and the sacrifices they made; the danger and fear of being undocumented; her childhood and family life in Pasadena, California; shares how her family became legalized in 1986, through the Family Fairness Act and Immigration and Reform Control Act; her childhood aspirations and the importance of education and history; college years at Occidental College, during which her passion emerged; initial involvement with CHIRLA; talks about her Chicana identity; her family’s involvement in the 2006 Mega March-United States immigration reform protests; her courtship and marriage to Mayron Payes, an immigration organizer at Center for Community Change and the Fair Immigrant Rights Movement [FIRM]; discusses her role as a mother and activist; further discusses her college years and activism within Movimento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan [MEChA]; reflects on the passing of Proposition 187 and the work she has done since then to create awareness and policy changes for undocumented children; talks about her experience at CHIRLA; how she is most proud of her immigration work and creating immigration reform as a national issue; she concludes the interview recalling her turbulent meetings with President Obama, regarding immigration rights and reform, and the ongoing struggle the movement has had with the United States Government.

Images

Field Value
File Name 5486_P01_online.jpg
Content Type image/jpeg
Size 33940
Description> Angelica Salas, 2014.

Multimedia

5486.2_T01_online.mp3

Transcript

Metadata

Field Value
ID 151
Title An oral history with Angelica Salas
Date 2014-12-08
WPA ID WPA_165
OH ID OH 5486.2
Citation Angelica Salas interviewed by Jael Muller, December 8, 2014, Los Angeles, California, Oral History # 5486.2, transcript, Women Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage, Center for Oral and Public History, California State University, Fullerton.
Restricted false
Created At 2019-01-14 21:49:01 UTC
Location Los Angeles, California
Language English
Subjects Citizenship → Immigration
Work → Discrimination at Work → Undocumented
Citizenship → Immigration → Deportation
Citizenship → Immigration → Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
Community Organizations → Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)
Citizenship → Immigration Reform
Community Organizations → Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA)
Elections → Propositions → Proposition 187
Police and Law Enforcement → ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement)
Historic Periods → 1990s
Elected Officials → Presidential → President Barack Obama
Family → Children
Family → Parents → activist parents
Activism → Advice on getting involved
Sexism → Sexism in the Workplace
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation
Discrimination, Racism, & Segregation → in politics
Direct Action → Marches → May Day March
Citizenship → Immigration Rights Movement
Sexism → Sexism in Politics
Citizenship → Immigration laws/legislation

Abstract

An oral history with Angelica Salas, executive director of the Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles [CHIRLA]. The interview was conducted for the Women, Politics, and Activism Since Suffrage Oral History Project for California State University, Fullerton’s Center for Oral and Public History. A second interview which covers Salas’ life history and political activism within the immigration reform movement. Specifically, this interview details Salas’ reaction to Proposition 187; her start at the Coalition of Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles (CHIRLA) after the passage of 187 in the State of California; dealing with the aftermath of Proposition 187, as well as the discriminatory effects waged on the community; her bittersweet reaction when Proposition 187 was ruled unconstitutional; discusses the decision to focus immigration on women and children, using their stories as a method of gaining recognition and bringing the issues of immigration to a different platform; her thoughts on President Obama’s Executive Order on immigration reform and the future of the immigration movement; discusses the challenges she faces within her work and how she balances her home life; what it means to be a public servant and advice she would give a young activist; the sexism she faces in her line of work; her thoughts on feminism; the differences between political activist and organizer; discusses her future plans of combating economic policies; how her activism has shaped the person she is today and what political courage means to her; shares reactions and feelings about May Day 2007; closes the interview with what she is most proud of, and the importance of recognizing the strength of the immigration reform movement.

Images

Field Value
File Name 5486_P01.jpg
Content Type image/jpeg
Size 60975
Description> Angelica Salas with interviewer, Jael Muller, 2014.