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 California State University, Fullerton

Interview Tips

Allopathic

Preparing for the Interview
When and if you get an interview for the medical school you applied to means that the school is considering you, but in no way is this an acceptance to the school. Interviews is a great way for the school to look as you as a person, beyond the transcripts and MCAT scores, and remember that in the interviews the school is looking to see you being yourself. During an interview you may feel stressed because of the questions they are asking you, but keep calm and answer them because they will see how you answer not necessarily the actual answer.

The questions below are typical questions that are asked and you should be able to answer them with no problem:

  • Why do you want to become a doctor?
  • How did you get here?
  • Why would you be a good doctor?
  • What are your strengths? Your weaknesses?
  • What would you do if you don't get in to medical school?
  • What do you feel are the most important qualities in being a good doctor?
  • What do you do to alleviate stress? What are your hobbies?
  • Are you a leader or a follower? Give examples...
  • What exposure have you had to the medical profession? Healthcare experience? What did you do when you volunteered at..?
  • What do you think you will like most about medicine/being a doctor? Least?

Types of Interviews

  • Panel- there are more than one interviewer asking you questions and they can range from surgeons to current medical students
  • Blind- the interviewer has not seen any part of your application, so be prepared for the question "Tell me about yourself"
  • Partial blind- the interviewer sees parts of the application such as the essay or the secondary application, but not the grades or scores
  • Open- the interviewer decides whether to look at your application or not

Osteopathic

Preparing for the Interview
When and if you get an interview for the medical school you applied to means that the school is considering you, but in no way is this an acceptance to the school. Interviews is a great way for the school to look as you as a person, beyond the transcripts and MCAT scores, and remember that in the interviews the school is looking to see you being yourself. During an interview you may feel stressed because of the questions they are asking you, but keep calm and answer them because they will see how you answer not necessarily the actual answer.

The questions below are typical questions that are asked and you should be able to answer them with no problem:

  • Why do you want to become a doctor?
  • How did you get here?
  • Why would you be a good doctor?
  • What are your strengths? Your weaknesses?
  • What would you do if you don't get in to medical school?
  • What do you feel are the most important qualities in being a good doctor?
  • What do you do to alleviate stress? What are your hobbies?
  • Are you a leader or a follower? Give examples...
  • What exposure have you had to the medical profession? Healthcare experience? What did you do when you volunteered at..?
  • What do you think you will like most about medicine/being a doctor? Least?

Dentistry

Preparing for the Interview
Schools will determine whom to choose for interviews by reviewing their GPA, DAT scores, extracurricular activities, and overall application. The only dental school that may accept students without an interview is NYU.

Most dental schools begin interviewing applicants in September or October and continue to do so through at least March, and sometimes into April and May. Remember to dress appropriately!

One of the important question that you really have to prepare for is "why dentistry?" The admissions committee really wants to know what your passion is towards dentistry. Other questions may consist of: why you are interested in that particular school, why you didn't perform well in a particular class or during a certain semester, how you prepared for the DAT, what dental related experience you have, your strengths and weaknesses, and you may even be quizzed on current events issues or general biology knowledge.

Types of Interviews

  • Panel- there are more than one interviewer asking you questions and they can range from surgeons to current medical students
  • Blind- the interviewer has not seen any part of your application, so be prepared for the question "Tell me about yourself"
  • Partial blind- the interviewer sees parts of the application such as the essay or the secondary application, but not the grades or scores.
  • Open- the interviewer decides whether to look at your application or not.

Optometry

Preparing for the Interview
When an institution offers you an interview, this means that they are considering you as a prospective student. During an interview you want to make sure that you are not tense and are very comfortable, typically the interviewer wants to see you think on your feet.

Some questions they may ask you:

  • Why do you want to be an optometrist?
  • What are your specific goals in optometry?
  • What motivated you to pursue your career goal?
  • What do you see yourself doing eight years from now, and how are you preparing yourself?
  • Which is more important to you, prestige or the type of job you do?
  • How would you describe yourself?
  • How do you think a friend or professor who knows you well would describe you?
  • What do you consider to be your greatest strengths and weaknesses?
  • What qualifications do you have that make you think you will be successful in optometry?

In what ways do you think you can make a contribution to optometry?
The list goes on of course; just make sure you are prepared for these types of questions. A lot of questions are about you, and these typically tend to be hard to answer.

Types of Interviews

  • Panel- there are more than one interviewer asking you questions and they can range from surgeons to current medical students
  • Blind- the interviewer has not seen any part of your application, so be prepared for the question "Tell me about yourself"
  • Partial blind- the interviewer sees parts of the application such as the essay or the secondary application, but not the grades or scores.
  • Open- the interviewer decides whether to look at your application or not.