Teaching Mathematics Concentration

The Teaching Mathematics concentration provides a first step for mathematics teaching career paths at the high school, community college, and university levels. In particular, the Teaching Mathematics concentration prepares students to enter the Single Subject Credential in Mathematics program. The Teaching Mathematics concentration, like the Pure Mathematics concentration, provides students with the opportunity to explore a wide range of mathematical topics, including abstract algebra, analysis, geometry, topology, number theory, and combinatorics. The Teaching Mathematics concentration also connects these advanced mathematical topics to those taught at the middle school or high school level.

In abstract algebra and analysis, students learn about the structures that form the foundation of high school algebra and calculus. In geometry and topology, students learn how the familiar world of plane geometry (high school geometry) differs from other geometries with different sets of axioms. In number theory and combinatorics, students study the properties of integers and the discrete structures that make up school mathematics, as well as abstract number systems and advanced topics that provide a deeper understanding of numbers.

 

Requirements 

In addition to the Core Requirements of the department, the Teaching Mathematics concentration requires the following courses:

       MATH 302 Modern Algebra (3 units)

       MATH 335 Mathematical Probability (3 units)

and one of the following:

       MATH 338 Statistics Applied to Natural Sciences (4 units

       MATH 370 Mathematical Model Building (3 units

Along with the above courses, students choose two from the following:

       MATH 407 Abstract Algebra (3 units)

       MATH 414 Topology (3 units)

       MATH 417 Foundations of Geometry (3 units)

       MATH 430 Number Theory (3 units)

       MATH 471 Combinatorics (3 units)

The Teaching Mathematics concentration also requires two “capstone” courses, taken in the final year of study:

       MATH 401 Algebra and Probability for the Secondary Teacher (3 units)

       MATH 402 Logic and Geometry for the Secondary Teacher (3 units)

Students who plan to enter the Single Subject Credential in Mathematics program should also take the following Secondary Education courses, which are prerequisites for the credential program:

       EDSC 304 Personal Proficiency in Educational Technology for Secondary Teachers (recommended)

       EDSC 310 The Teaching Experience

       EDSC 320 Adolescence

       EDSC 330 Literacy Development in Secondary Schools

       EDSC 340 Diversity in Secondary Schools

       EDSC 410 English Language Learners (Recommended)

Note: While EDSC 304 and EDSC 410 are recommended prior to the start of the credential program, both are required for completion of the credential program. 

Please see the prerequisite diagram PDF File Opens in new window of the courses required for this concentration.

 

Careers 

A career in teaching is incredibly rewarding. Teachers of mathematics prepare the next generation of scientists, engineers, technology professionals, and mathematicians for the important work of the future. Teachers are in demand at the middle school, high school, community college, and university levels.

Teaching positions typically require some training beyond the Bachelor’s degree. The Teaching Mathematics concentration prepares students for four major avenues for further training in teaching mathematics:

  • The primary avenue is the Single Subject Credential in Mathematics program, which prepares you to teach mathematics at the high school level. 
  • Students interested in teaching mathematics at the middle school level or early high school level (grades 6-10) may want to consider the Foundational Level Mathematics Credential program. Please note that you do not need to major in mathematics to enter the Foundational Level Mathematics Credential program. 
  • Students in the Teaching Mathematics concentration often go on to teach at the community college level. Teaching at the community college level generally requires a Master's degree in mathematics. The mathematics department offers a Master’s degree in Mathematics in three concentrations, including a teaching concentration designed for community college and high school teachers. 
  • Finally, teaching at the university level typically requires a Ph.D. If you are considering a Ph.D. program in pure mathematics, you may want to consider the Pure Mathematics concentration instead. However, there is a growing demand for mathematics faculty who specialize in mathematics education, and hold a Ph.D. in education or mathematics education. The Teaching Mathematics concentration provides an excellent foundation for these Ph.D. programs. If you are interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in education or mathematics education, faculty in the Teaching Mathematics concentration can help you find a program that fits your needs.

 

Faculty

Martin V. Bonsangue, Professor of Mathematics, Professional Development and Mathematics History

Todd CadwalladerOlsker, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Undergraduate Mathematics Education

Bridget K. Druken, Assistant Professor of Mathematics,  Professional Development and Developing Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching

Cherie Ichinose, Associate Professor of Mathematics, Online Mathematics Education

Armando M. Martinez-Cruz, Professor of Mathematics, Mathematical Problem Solving; Learning within Dynamic Geometry Environments 

Alison S. Marzocchi, Assistant Professor of Mathematics,  Recruitment and Retention of Underrepresented Students in Postsecondary Mathematics Degree

David Pagni, Professor of Mathematics, Professional Development, Professional Learning Communities

Roberto Soto, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Representation Theory of Groups, K-12 Professional Development

 

Research

Faculty in the Teaching Mathematics concentration are actively involved in mathematics education research. Many faculty members work with undergraduate students in their research. Undergraduates who participate in research often have an advantage when applying for jobs or graduate school admissions. Please contact faculty directly to find out more about possible research opportunities.

 

Pictures

picture 7

Recent CSUF mathematics single-subject credential program graduates with Dr. Cherie Ichinose, May 2018

 

 

 

teaching2 

First semester CSUF mathematics single-subject teacher candidates at California Mathematics Council-South conference in Palm Springs, 2017 with Dr. Alison Marzocchi and Dr. Cherie Ichinose.

teaching1

Recent CSUF mathematics single-subject credential program graduates, May 2017.

 

teaching4 

Math majors representing the Math Club, SMART Girls, and Supplemental Instruction, Spring 2017.

teaching5

Math majors and SMART Girls' club officers, Spring 2017.

 

teaching6 

Family Feud Night with Math Club, Spring 2017.