NRCAL

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2017 Summer Institute 

Map information for 2017 Summer Institute participants 

Summer Institute Campus Map

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About NRCAL

NRCAL will be a 21st century learning center and, as such, will integrate advanced technology throughout its program. Learners will have opportunities to research, create, collaborate, communicate, and apply critical thinking skills to all learning experiences.

Technology such as wikis, blogs, online communities, movie-making and animation software, video conferencing and creation software will be used by learners and educators in instructional and collaborative settings.

NRCAL teacher education courses will model a 21st Century learning environment and apply Universal Design for Learning principles that provide candidates with varied opportunities for accessing, engaging with and demonstrating understanding of content. Faculty professional development will also feature these same principles in an effort to help teachers and language instructors experience the true potential of 21st century teaching and learning.

This site provided resources on workshops and seminars delivered during the 2015 Professional Development for Teaching Asian Languages Seminar. The site was developed for faculty, students, and teachers.

Further resources for K12 Teachers, World Language Instructors, Teacher Educators, Researchers, and Partners available at Our Fullerton University websiteOpens in new window .


The National Resource Center for Asian Languages (NRCAL) was designed to improve the nation’s capacity for the teaching and learning of Asian languages including Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, and Japanese. California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) has made a strong commitment to supporting less commonly taught languages, serving diverse student populations, expanding research on second language acquisition, and enhancing teaching and learning. NRCAL’s main focus is to improve the teaching, learning, and research of Asian languages in the United States by drawing on the expertise of Asian language scholars, educators, and community stakeholders. Training students to be bilingual not only enhances their cognition, employment opportunities, and cultural competency, but also improves national business development, innovation, and security. Our goals are achievable through collaboration with K-12 school districts and community-based organizations.